June 9, 2018 | Science News

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June 9, 2018View Digital Issue

Editor's Note

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute reflects on the history and legacy of Science News editors.
By Nancy Shute | May 5, 2018
Magazine issue: Vol. 193, No. 10 , June 9, 2018 , p. 2

Features

Lara Diamond

Feature

Consumers face lots of choices and unanswered questions when they get personal genomic information related to disease risk from the Internet.
Tech fashion show illustration

Feature

Casual daywear may someday contain some serious tech. But engineers have to take conventional electronics and make them comfortable to wear.

Call to Action

SUPPORT SCIENCE NEWS

Science News is a nonprofit.

Help us keep you informed.

Editor's Note

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute reflects on the history and legacy of Science News editors.

Features

Tech fashion show illustration
Casual daywear may someday contain some serious tech. But engineers have to take conventional electronics and make them comfortable to wear.
Lara Diamond
Consumers face lots of choices and unanswered questions when they get personal genomic information related to disease risk from the Internet.

News

MACS1149-JD1 galaxy
Scientists find evidence that stars were forming just 250 million years after the universe was born.
satellite image of North Korea's nuclear test site
After North Korea’s most recent nuclear test, two underground cave-ins occurred, possibly rendering the facility unusable, a new study suggests.
honeybee
Holding global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius by 2100 could help protect tens of thousands of insect, plant and vertebrate species.
 Man Bac archaeological site
Two waves of ancient migration from China to Southeast Asia spread farming and languages.
E. coli
People with type A blood are more likely to develop severe diarrhea from E. coli infections.
green blooded lizard
Pigment buildups that would cause jaundice in people are normal for some New Guinea skinks.
sea slug
Long-term memories might be encoded in RNA, a controversial study in sea slugs suggests.
Europa
A fresh look at old data suggests that NASA’s Galileo spacecraft may have seen a plume from Jupiter’s icy moon Europa in 1997.
illustration of quarks
For the first time, scientists used experimental data to estimate the pressure inside a proton.
gas cloud
An interstellar gas cloud dubbed the Dark Doodad Nebula looks like a wispy, thin cylinder. But it’s actually a flat sheet.
red-eared slider turtle
Scientists have found a temperature-responsive gene that controls young turtles’ sex fate.
illustration of mental map
This AI creates mental maps of its environment much like mammals do.
seven planetary nebulae
New ideas about stellar evolution help explain why astronomers see so many bright planetary nebulae where they ought not be.
self-driving car laser sensing
Most autonomous cars are city drivers. This one’s made for cross-country road trips.
northern climate
A cold-sensing protein has adapted to different local climates, also affecting risk of migraine.
language students
A crucial period for language learning may extend well into teen years, a new study suggests.
The disastrous form of Bd chytrid fungus could have popped up just 50 to 120 years ago.

Notebook

Oak processionary caterpillar
Oak processionary moths have invaded England and threatened the pleasure of spring breezes.
Apollo 7 crew
Apollo 7 crewmembers underwent their first major tests 50 years ago. Today, U.S. astronauts struggle to get into space.
Globetrotters are responsible for about 8 percent of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions.

Reviews & Previews

At the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, the exhibit “Outbreak” highlights how infectious diseases shape our world.
whale skeleton, formanifera skeletons, and a rhinoceros beetle exoskeleton
In Skeletons, two paleobiologists recount how and why skeletons evolved, as well as the variety of forms they take and the many purposes they serve.
a photo of a face with two different eye colors
From eugenics to gene editing, Carl Zimmer’s She Has Her Mother’s Laugh recounts genetics’ biggest discoveries.

Letters to the Editor

Readers had questions about pesticides, Hawking radiation and the intersection of science and the public.

Science Visualized

Some heavier dinos had a strategy to keep eggs warm without crushing them: sit in an opening in the middle of the clutch instead of on top of them.