October 28, 2017 | Science News

SUPPORT SCIENCE NEWS

Science News is a nonprofit.

Help us keep you informed.

October 28, 2017View Digital Issue

Editor's Note

Acting Editor in Chief Elizabeth Quill says the passion to acquire knowledge and apply it lives in both engineers and scientists.
By Elizabeth Quill | October 10, 2017
Magazine issue: Vol. 192 No. 7 , October 28, 2017 , p. 2

Features

illustrations of vampires

Feature

Blood-sucking animals have specialized physiology and other tools to live on a diet rich in protein and lacking in some nutrients.
illustration of syringe with flu viruses

Feature

Scientists are developing a universal vaccine against flu, making annual shots a thing of the past.

Call to Action

SUPPORT SCIENCE NEWS

Science News is a nonprofit.

Help us keep you informed.

Editor's Note

Acting Editor in Chief Elizabeth Quill says the passion to acquire knowledge and apply it lives in both engineers and scientists.

Features

illustration of syringe with flu viruses
Scientists are developing a universal vaccine against flu, making annual shots a thing of the past.
illustrations of vampires
Blood-sucking animals have specialized physiology and other tools to live on a diet rich in protein and lacking in some nutrients.

News

gooseneck barnacles on a boat
Researchers report finding 289 living Japanese marine species that washed up on American shores on debris from the 2011 East Japan earthquake and tsunami.
Richard Thaler, University of Chicago
Behavioral economist Richard Thaler started influential investigations of behavioral economics, which earned him the 2017 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences.
honeybees
A controversial group of chemicals called neonicotinoids has a global impact, tests of honey samples show.
Stone Age hunter-gatherers
Ancient DNA expands foragers’ social, mating networks.
2017 chemistry Nobel winners
An imaging technique that gives up-close 3-D views of proteins is honored in this year's chemistry Nobel Prize.
hazy Pluto
The New Horizons team searched for rings around Pluto, and found nothing. That suggests the spacecraft’s next destination might be ring-free too.
Weiss, Thorne, Barish
Pioneers of LIGO collaboration win for finding spacetime ripples from two spiraling black holes.
Hall, Rosbash and Young
Circadian clock researchers take home the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine.
baby with microcephaly
A mutation in a protein that helps Zika exit cells may play a big role in microcephaly.
telescope in Graz, Austria
A Sept. 29 ultrasecure quantum video chat demonstrates the potential for quantum communications across the globe.
simulated spiraling black holes
LIGO and Virgo spot spacetime ripples in their first joint detection.
oragami robots
These robots change shape by slipping into different origami exoskeletons.
Upside-down jellyfish are the first known animals without a brain to enter a sleeplike state.
tadpole
Frog brains help organize muscle and nerve patterns early in development.
 Gryposaurus monumentensis
Scientists studying dinosaur poop found that some duck-billed dinos cheated on their vegetarian diets by snacking on crustaceans.
hermit crab
A newly discovered hermit crab takes its cue from peanut worms and uses walking corals as a permanent shelter.
A new look at an old fossil shows that some species of baby ichthyosaurs may have dined on squid.
African San people
Genes from South African fossils suggest humans emerged close to 300,000 years ago.
degraded forest in Bolivia
Analyses of satellite images suggest that degraded forests now release more carbon than they store.

Notebook

La Brea Tar Pits
Using CT scans, one orthopedic surgeon is on a quest to diagnose deformities in long-dead saber-toothed cats.
 S-3 Viking aircraft
Fifty years ago, aviation experts tried helping commercial aircraft come to a stop during landing by catching them in massive nets. The idea crash-landed for commercial flights, but it’s still used in the military.
injured teen
Almost 20 percent of U.S. teens have had at least one diagnosed concussion in the past, an analysis of a 2016 national survey finds.

Reviews & Previews

Jeff Donnelly
Geologists find clues to the future of deadly hurricanes, written in stone and sand, in the new NOVA documentary “Killer Hurricanes.”
illustration of mammoths
'Rise of the Necrofauna' examines the technical and ethical challenges of bringing woolly mammoths and other long-gone creatures back from the dead.
Special Relativity and Classical Theory and The Physical World offer deep dives into physical reality’s mathematical foundations.

Letters to the Editor

Readers had questions about brain flexibility, black sea snakes and photon collisions.

Science Visualized

sea slugs
Hundreds of marine animals from Japan have washed up on U.S. beaches since the destructive 2011 earthquake and tsunami.