September 29, 2018 | Science News

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September 29, 2018View Digital Issue

Editor's Note

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute discusses our behind the scenes look at the giant equipment used to study the smallest bits of matter.
By Nancy Shute | September 9, 2018
Magazine issue: Vol. 194, No. 6 , September 29, 2018 , p. 2

Features

impossible burger

Feature

Researchers hope to replace whole animal agriculture and feed the world with lab-made meats or plants.
researcher inside KATRIN

Feature

New experiments that rely on very large machines have begun to probe the weak points of particle physics.

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Help us keep you informed.

Editor's Note

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute discusses our behind the scenes look at the giant equipment used to study the smallest bits of matter.

Features

researcher inside KATRIN
New experiments that rely on very large machines have begun to probe the weak points of particle physics.
impossible burger
Researchers hope to replace whole animal agriculture and feed the world with lab-made meats or plants.

News

naked mole-rat
Hormones in the naked mole-rat queen’s poop turn subordinate nest-mates into surrogate parents.
IVF procedures
Kids born from reproductive technologies such as in vitro fertilization are susceptible to high blood pressure as adolescents, a small study finds.
wheat
Hotter, hungrier pests likely to do 10 percent to 25 percent more damage to grains for each warmer degree.
gravity illustration
Researchers have measured Newton’s gravitational constant, known as Big G, with the greatest precision yet.
AWAKE plasma cell
For the first time, scientists accelerated electrons using plasma waves from proton beams.
guns
Globally, the estimated number of gun deaths due to homicides, suicides and unintentional injuries went up from 1990 to 2016.
D-Wave quantum computer
In calculations involving about 2,000 quantum bits, a D-Wave machine reproduced the behavior of exotic substances.
Hurricane Katrina
The 28 named tropical storms that swirled through the Atlantic Ocean in 2005 is about as many as the region can produce in a year.
photo illustration of sun's magnetic fields
The sun spits out more and weirder gamma rays than anyone expected, which could give a new view of the sun’s magnetic fields.
an illustration of coxsackieviruses
Birthrates and immunity rates predict the spread of viruses that cause hand, foot and mouth disease.
algal bloom off Florida's west coast
Scientists around the United States are developing programs that can predict harmful algal blooms in advance.
a colorful scanning electron micrograph showing a close-up of brain nerve cells
Human antibodies that target key brain proteins cause memory trouble when delivered into mice’s brains.
skeletons
Graveyard finds may come from an ancient European warrior household with political pull.
Jupiter's magnetic field illustration
New results from NASA’s Juno spacecraft reveal different magnetic behavior in the planet’s northern and southern hemispheres.
starburst galaxy
Scientists were able to see the abundance of star-forming gas and dust in a giant galaxy from when the universe was less than 2 billion years old.
deicing plane
A new sun-powered material could someday melt the ice off airplane wings, wind turbines and rooftops.
skull channels
Minuscule channels connect the skull to the brain’s outer membrane, studies in mice and people show.
a beagle puppy romping in some grass
Scientists have used CRISPR’s molecular scissors in beagle puppies to repair a genetic mutation that causes muscular dystrophy.
poppy flower
Analyzing the poppy’s genome reveals the evolutionary history of morphine.
lithium-oxygen battery
A new version of the lithium-oxygen battery could pack more energy and last longer than its predecessors.

Notebook

killifish
The fastest known maturing vertebrate in the lab is even faster in the wild.
snapping spaghetti
Researchers have discovered how to snap spaghetti sticks without sending bits of pasta flying.
1968 Hong Kong pandemic flu strain
A half-century after the Hong Kong flu pandemic, scientists are getting closer to a universal vaccine.
A photo of a firefly flashing
Fireflies use their flashing lights for mating and maybe even to ward away predators.

Reviews & Previews

pangolin
In ‘Poached,’ a journalist reports from the front lines of the illegal wildlife trade and shows how conservationists are fighting back.
Mimosa pudica plant
‘The Revolutionary Genius of Plants’ challenges the brain-centered view of intelligence.

Letters to the Editor

Readers pondered how to effectively combat fake news, questioned the result of a clinical trial, and wanted to know more about neutrinos.

Science Visualized

air pollution over India
The first country-by-country look at how dirty air affects when we die shows it can have more impact on mortality than breast or lung cancer.