September 30, 2017 | Science News

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September 30, 2017View Digital Issue

Editor's Note

Acting Editor in Chief Elizabeth Quill discusses how nature can inspire people to make long-lasting change.
By Elizabeth Quill | September 9, 2017
Magazine issue: Vol. 192 No. 5 , September 30, 2017 , p. 2

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SUPPORT SCIENCE NEWS

Science News is a nonprofit.

Help us keep you informed.

Editor's Note

Acting Editor in Chief Elizabeth Quill discusses how nature can inspire people to make long-lasting change.

Features

air pollution
Air pollution levels have come down since the 1970s, but smog is being linked with a growing list of diseases, including dementia, obesity, diabetes and even Parkinson’s.
underwater shipwreck
The way bats navigate their environs inspires engineers to develop better sonar and robots that can estimate crop yield or deliver packages
brown bat
New lab technologies that let bats fly freely allow scientists to track nerve cell signals as the animals dodge and weave.

News

white dwarf
Astronomers have hunted down a star seen exploding in the year 1437 and traced it since, offering clues to the stages of a white dwarf.
sea slug
Researchers are turning to nature to create adhesives that work in the wet environment of the human body.
SDO image of sun
The sun tends to release its biggest flares at the ends of solar cycles — and we might finally be able to test why.
a common fungus, Aspergillus fumigatus
Immune system resists fungal infection by directing spores to their death.
illustration of neurons
A dangerous form of the chemical messenger dopamine causes cellular mayhem in the very nerve cells that make it.
Ribs attached to neck bones could have signaled trouble for woolly rhinos, a new study suggests.
illustration of waves
Vibrations of a tiny cantilever could help reveal why quantum rules fail on large scales.
Zika virus and stem cells
The Zika virus targets cells that cause glioblastoma, an aggressive form of brain cancer, studies in human cells and mice show.
tar
Neandertals could have made tar with simple methods and materials on hand, new experiments show.
illustration of a ring of debris
New looks at older data on the weirdly flickering Tabby’s star muddy possible explanations — but it’s still probably not aliens.
illustration of human gut
Microbes may tamper with the production of tiny molecules in brain regions that help control anxiety.
Hyracotherium illustration
Fossils reveal that as horses evolved to have fewer toes, they also got stronger and faster.
person getting a flu shot
A set of nine genes predicted an effective response to the flu vaccine in young people, no matter the strains.
Smooth, vertical surfaces may be blind spots for bats and cause some animals to face-plant, study suggests.
XENON1T
Scientists continue the search for particles that make up the universe’s missing matter.
quantum communication
Photon information processing on nanoscale could enable future communication networks.

Notebook

flask of beer and yeast
Wild beer studies are teaching scientists and brewers about the tropical fruit smell and sour taste of success.
Polypterus
Analysis of specimens from China implies ray-finned fishes evolved later than previously thought.
50 years ago, the effects of chronic marijuana smoking on mental health were hazy. They still are.
photo of Uranus taken by Voyager in 1986
By studying variations in the rings of Uranus, researchers have determined the mass and density of the planet’s moon Cressida.

Reviews & Previews

chicken farm
A new book takes a hard look at the chicken industry for its role in fostering antibiotic resistance.

Letters to the Editor

Readers have questions about miniature spacecraft project and Canaanite genealogy.

Science Visualized

pollen on a bee under UV light
Flower reproduction depends on the pollen that collects in hard-to-reach spots on bees, a new study shows.