Animals

More Stories in Animals

  1. Olm salamander in cave
    Animals

    One blind, aquatic salamander may have sat mostly still for seven years

    Olms may live for about century and appear to spend their time moving sparingly.

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  2. Cope's vine snake
    Animals

    Snakes suffered after a frog-killing fungus wiped out their food

    A frog-killing fungus that swept through Panama had a hidden effect. A new study finds that snake diversity declined post-fungus at one field station.

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  3. an Upside-down jellyfish
    Animals

    Jellyfish snot can sting swimmers who never touch the animal

    Researchers have found mobile cellular blobs coated with stinging cells in mucus from a jellyfish that sits upside-down on the seafloor.

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  4. cat smizing
    Animals

    With a litter of tactics, scientists work to tame cat allergies

    New research may reduce the allergen levels of house cats or make people less reactive to our feline friends.

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  5. adult wolf and pups
    Life

    Wolves regurgitate blueberries for their pups to eat

    The behavior, documented for the first time, suggests that fruit may be more important to wolves than previously thought.

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  6. Queensland Australia wildfire
    Ecosystems

    Will Australia’s forests bounce back after devastating fires?

    Intense bushfires that have blazed down Australia’s eastern coast could have long-lasting effects on the continent’s unique plants and animals.

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  7. Oceans board game
    Life

    The board game Oceans captures the beauty and ferocity of marine life

    North Star Games' Oceans refines the gameplay of its predecessor, Evolution, and creates an immersive, nuanced game world.

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  8. beaked whales at the water's surface
    Animals

    Beaked whales may evade killer whales by silently diving in sync

    To slip past predators, beaked whales appear to synchronize their deep dives, staying silent while not hunting and ascending far from where they dove.

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  9. honeybees
    Life

    Engineered honeybee gut bacteria trick attackers into self-destructing

    Tailored microbes defend bees with a gene-silencing process called RNA interference that takes on viruses or mites.

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