Archaeology

  1. Archaeology

    Stone Age Combustion: Fire use proposed at ancient Israeli site

    A Stone Age site in Israel contains the oldest evidence of controlled fire use in Asia or Europe, from around 750,000 years ago, a research team reports.

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  2. Archaeology

    Agriculture’s roots go tropical

    Tropical-forest dwellers in Central America may have cultivated manioc and other root crops as many as 7,000 years ago.

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  3. Archaeology

    Early farmers crop up in Jordan

    An ancient site discovered in southern Jordan dating back more than 9,000 years may help to illuminate the origins of farming in the Middle East.

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  4. Archaeology

    Israeli cave yields Stone Age kills

    A recently discovered Israeli cave has yielded some of the earliest known evidence of hunting by humans or our evolutionary ancestors, from around 300,000 to 200,000 years ago.

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  5. Archaeology

    Cat’s Cradle? New find pushes back origin of tamed felines

    Archaeological finds on the Mediterranean island of Cyprus indicate that people domesticated cats by about 9,500 years ago, long before cat taming achieved prominence in ancient Egypt.

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  6. Archaeology

    Laser scanners map rock art

    Researchers have developed a way to use laser-based surveying equipment to quickly and easily create detailed images of ancient rock art.

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  7. Archaeology

    Reconstructing ancient drinking habits

    A new technique involving the analysis of residue from pottery jars can discern the color of wine consumed by ancient Egyptians.

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  8. Archaeology

    Stone Age statuettes don disputed apparel

    A report describing woven caps, skirts, belts, and other apparel on Venus figurines from the Stone Age draws some critical responses.

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  9. Archaeology

    How agriculture ground to a start

    A major advance in agriculture occurred around 11,000 years ago, when western Asians began to walk through patches of wild barley and wheat and scoop handfuls of ripened grains off the ground, a report suggests.

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  10. Archaeology

    Lion skeleton found in Egyptian tomb

    Archaeologists found the skeleton of a once-mummified lion at an Egyptian site dating to more than 2,000 years ago, confirming suspicions that lions were revered as sacred animals.

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  11. Archaeology

    Bones of Invention: German cave yields Stone Age figurines

    Three ivory figurines found in southwestern Germany may belong to one of the world's oldest known art traditions, dating to more than 30,000 years ago.

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  12. Archaeology

    Bones of Invention: German cave yields Stone Age figurines

    Three ivory figurines found in southwestern Germany may belong to one of the world's oldest known art traditions, dating to more than 30,000 years ago.

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