Archaeology

More Stories in Archaeology

  1. San hunter gatherers
    Humans

    Humans’ maternal ancestors may have arisen 200,000 years ago in southern Africa

    New DNA findings on humankind’s maternal roots don’t offer a complete picture of how and when Homo sapiens emerged.

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  2. hand stencils
    Humans

    Dating questions challenge whether Neandertals drew Spanish cave art

    A method used to date cave paintings in Spain may have overestimated the art’s age by thousands of years, putting its creation after Neandertal times.

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  3. Easter Island statues
    Humans

    Quarrying stone for Easter Island statues made soil more fertile for farming

    Easter Island’s Polynesian society grew crops in soil made especially fertile by the quarrying of rock for large, humanlike statues, a study suggests.

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  4. Bronze Age skeleton
    Archaeology

    Ancient European households combined the rich and poor

    Homes combined “haves” and “have-nots” in a male-run system, suggests a study that challenges traditional views of ancient social stratification.

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  5. ancient baby bottles
    Archaeology

    Baby bottles may go back millennia in Europe

    Europe’s early farmers used spouted vessels to wean infants, an analysis of residue from animal milk left in the containers suggests.

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  6. St. Catherines Island
    Humans

    An island grave site hints at far-flung ties among ancient Americans

    Great Lakes and southeastern coastal hunter-gatherers had direct contact around 4,000 years ago, a study suggests.

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  7. Temple Scroll
    Humans

    The longest Dead Sea Scroll sports a salt finish that the others lack

    A newly discovered salty lamination on the Temple Scroll could help explain why the ancient manuscript’s parchment is remarkably bright.

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  8. human skeletons
    Humans

    DNA indicates how ancient migrations shaped South Asian languages and farming

    Farming in the region may have sprung up locally, while herders from afar sparked language changes.

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  9. stone points
    Humans

    Stone tools may place some of the first Americans in Idaho 16,500 years ago

    Newly discovered stone artifacts support the idea that North America’s first settlers traveled down the Pacific coast and then turned eastward.

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