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Earth & Environment

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PERISHABLE PLASTIC  Shore crabs can trap microplastic pollution in their gills, a lab study finds. 

More people are trying to get rid of the invasive northern snakehead by eating it, a strategy that can reduce numbers but probably won’t eliminate the problem.

FLOOD WARNING  Gravity variations from the sodden Missouri River basin could have predicted this 2011 flood months in advance, scientists say.

  • Climate

    
    Science Ticker

    Meat-eaters’ greenhouse gas emissions are twice as high as vegans’

    Meat-eaters dietary GHG emissions are twice as high as those of vegans, a study finds.

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  • Earth

  • Agriculture

    Science Stats

    Where antibiotics go

    Of the 51 tons of antibiotics consumed every day in the United States, about 80 percent goes into animal production.
  • Ecosystems

    
    Gory Details

    If you really hate a species, try eating it

    Dining on invasive fish such as snakehead and lionfish can reduce their numbers, but we can’t entirely eat our way out this problem.

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    Science Ticker

    Invasive insect tied to shrinking river

    A river in North Carolina shrank after a hemlock woolly adelgid eradicated eastern hemlock trees in the region.

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  • Toxicology

    
    Science Ticker

    Fukushima contamination affects butterfly larvae

    Butterfly larvae fed leaves with radioactive cesium from the Fukushima nuclear disaster had a higher rate of death and development abnormalities than larvae that got leaves from a location farther from the accident.

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  • Pollution

  • Sustainability

  • Oceans

    
    Wild Things

    Dusk heralds a feeding frenzy in the waters off Oahu

    Even dolphins benefit when layers of organisms in the water column overlap for a short period.

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