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Genes & Cells

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A deaf guinea pig's hearing improves when electrical signals from its cochlear implant (shown, left) are coupled with gene therapy to stimulate nerve cell regeneration in the inner ear.

By carrying sponges in their beaks while they hunt, dolphins may be able to sweep away much more sand from the ocean floor and scare up new types of food. Analysis of the animal's fatty acids support this idea.

The genes of the rainbow trout that have been retained and those that have been lost suggest that the genetic material of vertebrates isn't edited as quickly as scientists thought.

  • Genetics

    
    Science Ticker

    Gene therapy with electrical pulses spurs nerve growth

    Deaf guinea pigs' hearing improves with electrical pulses from a hearing implant are combined with gene therapy, a new study shows.

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    Science Ticker

    Rainbow trout genome shows how genetic material evolved

    The finding challenges the idea that whole genome duplications are followed by quick, massive reorganization and deletions of genetic material.

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  • Cells

    
    Science Ticker

    Insulating sheath on nerve cells isn't an even coat

    Myelin doesn't evenly coat axons, a finding that runs counter to what scientists suspected.

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    Science Ticker

    Protein that gets sperm into egg identified

    The protein Folr4 on a reproductive egg plays this crucial role in the fusion of the sperm and egg, research shows.

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  • Development

    
    Scicurious

    The fluid part of semen plays a seminal role

    We often think of reproduction as involving only sperm and egg. But a new study highlights the seminal role of liquid semen in fertility and healthy offspring.

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    Science Ticker

    Mosquito sperm may sense smells

    Mosquitoes’ sperm may have chemical sensors that detect odors similar to the way the insect’s antennae sort smells.

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  • Physiology

    
    Scicurious

    Males compete all the way to sperm shape

    An association between the ratio of certain proteins in mouse sperm and sexual competition raises many questions about what exactly gives a sperm a good head.

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  • Immune Science

  • Microbiology

    
    Science Ticker

    Amoebas’ munching may cause diarrheal disease

    Amoebas biting and swallowing pieces of human cells may be what causes amebic dysentery, a potentially fatal diarrheal disease in the developing world.

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  • Epigenetics

    
    Science Ticker

    Chemical changes to genes make twins' pain differ

    Chemical changes to genes may make identical twins experience pain differently.

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    Letters to the Editor

    Feedback

    Readers discuss the names of really big numbers and whether Lamarckian evolution is making a comeback.
  • Molecular Evolution

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