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Genes & Cells

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BARE BONES  Differences between the skeletons of modern humans (back) and Neandertals (front) may stem from the way the groups use some genes involved in bone growth. Chemical modifications of DNA may have dialed down the activity of these genes in Neandertals, leading to stocky frames. 

Genetic changes associated with Down's syndrome may happen on all chromosomes, not just chromosome 21, a study suggests.

ODD ALLIES  Domesticated grapevines play host to the bacterium P. acnes, which relies on the plant for essential DNA repairs.

  • Genetics

    
    Science Ticker

    Down’s syndrome goes beyond chromosome 21

    A genetic analysis suggests that the DNA changes linked to Down's syndrome happen on all chromosomes, not just the 21st.

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  • Cells

    
    Science Ticker

    How cells keep from popping

    The protein SWELL1 stops cells from swelling so much that they burst, a new study shows.

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  • Development

    
    Scicurious

    The fluid part of semen plays a seminal role

    We often think of reproduction as involving only sperm and egg. But a new study highlights the seminal role of liquid semen in fertility and healthy offspring.

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    Science Ticker

    Mosquito sperm may sense smells

    Mosquitoes’ sperm may have chemical sensors that detect odors similar to the way the insect’s antennae sort smells.

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  • Physiology

    
    Scicurious

    Males compete all the way to sperm shape

    An association between the ratio of certain proteins in mouse sperm and sexual competition raises many questions about what exactly gives a sperm a good head.

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  • Immune Science

  • Microbiology

    
    Science Ticker

    Amoebas’ munching may cause diarrheal disease

    Amoebas biting and swallowing pieces of human cells may be what causes amebic dysentery, a potentially fatal diarrheal disease in the developing world.

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  • Epigenetics

    
    Science Ticker

    Chemical changes to genes make twins' pain differ

    Chemical changes to genes may make identical twins experience pain differently.

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    Letters to the Editor

    Feedback

    Readers discuss the names of really big numbers and whether Lamarckian evolution is making a comeback.
  • Molecular Evolution

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