Genetics

  1. tenofovir
    Genetics

    Some people may have genes that hamper a drug’s HIV protection

    Newly discovered genetic variants could explain why an anti-HIV medication doesn’t protect everyone.

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  2. newborn mice
    Genetics

    How chemical exposure early in life is ‘like a ticking time bomb’

    Some early life experiences can affect health, but only if unmasked by events in adulthood.

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  3. RNA illustrations
    Genetics

    Here are 5 RNAs that are stepping out of DNA’s shadow

    RNAs do a lot more than act as middlemen for protein building. Here are a few of the ways they affect your health and disease.

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  4. mosquito
    Health & Medicine

    Testing mosquito pee could help track the spread of diseases

    A new way to monitor the viruses that wild mosquitoes are spreading passes its first outdoor test.

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  5. emu
    Life

    How emus and ostriches lost the ability to fly

    Changes in regulatory DNA, rather than mutations to genes themselves, grounded some birds, a study finds.

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  6. a photo of David Baltimore in a lab
    Genetics

    A Nobel Prize winner argues banning CRISPR babies won’t work

    Human gene editing needs responsible regulation, but a ban isn’t the way to go, says Nobel laureate David Baltimore.

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  7. Siberian mammoth
    Genetics

    Resurrecting woolly mammoth cells is hard to do

    Japanese scientists say some proteins in frozen mammoth cells may still work after 28,000 years. But that activity may be more mouse than mammoth.

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  8. embryo fertilization
    Genetics

    Geneticists push for a 5-year global ban on gene-edited babies

    Prominent scientists are using the word “moratorium” to make it clear that experiments to create babies with altered genes are wrong, for now.

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  9. DNA editing
    Genetics

    A CRISPR spin-off causes unintended typos in DNA

    One type of CRISPR gene editor makes frequent and widespread mistakes, studies in mice and rice reveal.

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  10. dog sniffing grass
    Genetics

    Genes might explain why dogs can’t sniff out some people under stress

    Genes and stress may change a person’s body odor, confusing police dogs.

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  11. people shaking hands
    Genetics

    A long handshake can spread your DNA to objects you didn’t touch

    Two new studies show that even brief contact with another person or object could transfer your DNA far and wide.

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  12. ancient grave
    Genetics

    DNA reveals early mating between Asian herders and European farmers

    A new genetic analysis could upend assumptions about the origins of Indo-European languages.

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