Genetics

  1. Norwich terrier
    Animals

    Some dog breeds may have trouble breathing because of a mutated gene

    Norwich terriers don’t have flat snouts, but can suffer the same wheezing as bulldogs. It turns out that a gene mutation tied to swelling could be to blame.

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  2. pond snails
    Genetics

    Tweaking one gene with CRISPR switched the way a snail shell spirals

    The first gene-edited snails confirm which gene is responsible for the direction of the shell’s spiral.

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  3. 3D circular RNA
    Genetics

    A lack of circular RNAs may trigger lupus

    Researchers close in on how low levels of a kind of RNA may trigger lupus — offering hope for future treatments for the autoimmune disease.

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  4. an infected ocean alga called Alexandrium
    Genetics

    A marine parasite’s mitochondria lack DNA but still churn out energy

    Missing mitochondrial DNA inside a parasitic marine microbe turned up inside the organism’s nucleus.

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  5. woman stretching
    Genetics

    A genetic scorecard could predict your risk of being obese

    A genetic score predicts who is at risk of severe obesity, but experts say lifestyle matters more than genes.

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  6. tenofovir
    Genetics

    Some people may have genes that hamper a drug’s HIV protection

    Newly discovered genetic variants could explain why an anti-HIV medication doesn’t protect everyone.

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  7. newborn mice
    Genetics

    How chemical exposure early in life is ‘like a ticking time bomb’

    Some early life experiences can affect health, but only if unmasked by events in adulthood.

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  8. RNA illustrations
    Genetics

    Here are 5 RNAs that are stepping out of DNA’s shadow

    RNAs do a lot more than act as middlemen for protein building. Here are a few of the ways they affect your health and disease.

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  9. mosquito
    Health & Medicine

    Testing mosquito pee could help track the spread of diseases

    A new way to monitor the viruses that wild mosquitoes are spreading passes its first outdoor test.

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  10. emu
    Life

    How emus and ostriches lost the ability to fly

    Changes in regulatory DNA, rather than mutations to genes themselves, grounded some birds, a study finds.

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  11. a photo of David Baltimore in a lab
    Genetics

    A Nobel Prize winner argues banning CRISPR babies won’t work

    Human gene editing needs responsible regulation, but a ban isn’t the way to go, says Nobel laureate David Baltimore.

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  12. Siberian mammoth
    Genetics

    Resurrecting woolly mammoth cells is hard to do

    Japanese scientists say some proteins in frozen mammoth cells may still work after 28,000 years. But that activity may be more mouse than mammoth.

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