Microbes

More Stories in Microbes

  1. tick attached to skin
    Health & Medicine

    New approaches may help solve the Lyme disease diagnosis dilemma

    Lyme disease is hard to detect, but scientists are investigating new diagnostic approaches.

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  2. norovirus strains
    Life

    Norovirus close-ups might help fight stomach flu

    Detailed views of a common stomach virus that causes vomiting and diarrhea could aid vaccine and disinfectant development.

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  3. Tara boat
    Microbes

    A global survey finds that the Arctic Ocean is a hot spot for viruses

    Scientists mapped virus diversity around the world’s oceans. That knowledge may be key to making better climate simulations.

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  4. an infected ocean alga called Alexandrium
    Genetics

    A marine parasite’s mitochondria lack DNA but still churn out energy

    Missing mitochondrial DNA inside a parasitic marine microbe turned up inside the organism’s nucleus.

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  5. hand holding poop sample cup
    Health & Medicine

    Studies can be in vitro, in vivo and now ‘in fimo’ — in poop

    Scientists have coined a new term — “in fimo” — to describe studies focused on feces.

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  6. yeast cell
    Microbes

    Mini ‘solar panels’ help yeast shine at churning out drug ingredients

    Microbes equipped with light-harvesting semiconductor particles generate useful chemicals much more efficiently than ordinary microbes.

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  7. mounds in the rock record
    Earth

    These ancient mounds may not be the earliest fossils on Earth after all

    A new analysis suggests that tectonics, not microbes, formed cone-shaped structures in 3.7-billion-year-old rock.

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  8. burying beetles
    Animals

    In cadaver caves, baby beetles grow better with parental goo

    A dead mouse — with the right microbial treatment from beetle parents — becomes a much better nursery than your average carcass.

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  9. cyanobacteria
    Earth

    These light-loving bacteria may survive surprisingly deep underground

    Traces of cyanobacteria DNA suggest that the microbes live deep below Earth’s surface.

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