Neuroscience

  1. mouse intestine
    Health & Medicine

    Full intestines, more than full stomachs, may tell mice to stop eating

    A new description of stretch-sensing nerve endings in mice’s intestines could lead to ways to treat obesity.

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  2. baking smells
    Neuroscience

    People who lack olfactory bulbs shouldn’t be able to smell. But some women can

    Some women who appear to lack the brain structures that relay scent messages still have an average sense of smell, and scientists have no idea how.

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  3. man sleeping
    Neuroscience

    Sleep may trigger rhythmic power washing in the brain

    Strong, rhythmic waves of cerebrospinal fluid wash into the human brain during sleep and may help clean out harmful proteins.

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  4. organoid
    Neuroscience

    Lab-grown organoids are more stressed-out than actual brain cells

    Compared with real brain tissue, organoids show big differences.

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  5. tadpole
    Health & Medicine

    Algae inside blood vessels could act as oxygen factories

    Two types of light-responsive algae make oxygen inside tadpoles’ blood vessels.

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  6. nerve cell illustration
    Neuroscience

    Light from outside the brain can turn on nerve cells in monkey brains

    An extra-sensitive light-responsive molecule allowed nerve cells to be switched on or off with dim light.

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  7. amyloid-beta protein
    Neuroscience

    Alzheimer’s may scramble metabolism’s connection to sleep

    Mice designed to have brain changes that mimic Alzheimer’s disease have altered reactions to blood sugar changes.

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  8. Cerebral organoids made of human cells (left) or chimpanzee cells (right)
    Neuroscience

    Organoids offer clues to how brains are made in humans and chimpanzees

    Three-dimensional clumps of brain cells offer clues about how brains get made in humans and chimpanzees.

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  9. line representation of brain waves
    Neuroscience

    Dueling brain waves during sleep may decide whether rats remember or forget

    In a slumbering rat, two distinct kinds of brain waves have opposite jobs.

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  10. Seth Shipman
    Health & Medicine

    Seth Shipman recorded a movie in DNA — and that’s just the beginning

    Seth Shipman is developing tools that may reveal hidden biological processes.

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  11. Maryam Shanechi
    Neuroscience

    Maryam Shanechi designs machines to read minds

    Maryam Shanechi creates computer programs that link brain and machine to one day help patients with paralysis or psychiatric disorders.

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  12. person painting with paintbrush held in their toes
    Humans

    Artists who paint with their feet have ‘toe maps’ in their brains

    Brain specialization comes with toe specialization in people who use their feet for painting, eating and writing.

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