Welcome to the Science News Now symposium!

For the past century, Science News has been a leader in accurate, evidence-based coverage of advances in science, medicine and technology, covering epochal events from the Scopes trial through the creation of the atom bomb, the space race, the discovery of black holes and now the pandemic. Join us Friday, Dec. 3 online for our free Science News Now symposium, with renowned researchers giving their insiders’ take on the latest discoveries – and on how science can help tackle the challenges of next 100 years.  

We are thrilled to tell you about our unique history and about this celebratory symposium. In these sessions, we’ll explore both big moments in science history and what’s new and next.


Agenda: Friday, December 3

10:00 – 11:15 a.m. ET

Welcome remarks
Maya Ajmera

President and CEO,
Society for Science
Publisher, Science News

Nancy Shute

Editor in Chief,
Science News

Science of the Pandemic: What We’ve Learned, Challenges that Remain

Extraordinary efforts by scientists worldwide have given us new weapons to fight the pandemic, but many big questions remain. In this session, reporters on Science News’ COVID coverage team talk with global leaders in the efforts to combat SARS-CoV-2. Panelists will explain what we’ve learned about how the virus spreads, and speak on the potential for new, more effective treatments.

Panelists:
Dianne K. Newman
Akiko Iwasaki, Ph.D.

Waldemar Von Zedtwitz Professor of Immunobiology and Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology
Professor of Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases)
Yale University
Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

a photo of Tiera FLetcher
Mark Denison, M.D.

Professor of Pediatrics
Professor of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology
Edward Claiborne Stahlman Chair in Pediatric Physiology and Cell Metabolism
Vanderbilt University

David Martinez, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Fellow in Dr. Ralph S. Baric’s Lab Department of Epidemiology. UNC–Chapel Hill
Hanna H. Gray Fellow, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Dianne K. Newman
Kanta Subbarao, M.P.H.

Director
WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza

Moderated by:

Tina Hesman Saey
Tina Hesman Saey, Ph.D.

Senior Writer, Molecular Biology, Science News

Erin Garcia de Jesús, Ph.D.

Staff Writer,
Science News

11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. ET

Stress and Resilience: How Our Bodies, Brains and Communities Respond to Crisis

Trauma and stress can have devastating impacts on our physical and mental health, and change our brains for the worse. But understanding the science of resiliency can help. New insights into how stress influences our brains, our behavior and our societies point to ways to recover from the pandemic and other challenges.  

Panelists:
Huda Akil, Ph.D.

Research Professor
Michigan Neuroscience Institute
Gardner C. Quarton Distinguished University
Professor of Neurosciences
Department of Psychiatry
University of Michigan Medical School

Panelist
Brandon Kohrt, M.D., Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
The George Washington University

Interviewed by:
Laura Sanders, Ph.D.

Senior Writer, Neuroscience,
Science News

Interviewer
Sujata Gupta

Social Sciences Writer,
Science News

1:00 – 2:00 p.m. ET

SPECIAL LIVE SESSION: Behind the Scenes as Science News Covers the Pandemic

What’s it like to report on a historic pandemic while living through it? Six Science News journalists share their experiences covering this story of a lifetime. Audience members will have the opportunity to ask questions in this live session.

Panelists:
Aimee Cunningham
Aimee Cunningham

Biomedical Writer, Science News

Tina Hesman Saey
Tina Hesman Saey, Ph.D.

Senior Writer, Molecular Biology, Science News

Erin Garcia de Jesús, Ph.D.

Staff Writer,
Science News

Sujata Gupta

Social Sciences Writer,
Science News

Jonathan Lambert

Staff Writer, Biological Sciences, Science News

Laura Sanders, Ph.D.

Senior Writer, Neuroscience,
Science News

Interviewer
Moderated by:
Nancy Shute

Editor in Chief,
Science News

2:15 – 3:00 p.m. ET

Grappling with Climate Change Communication and Misinformation

Increasing extreme weather events make public conversations about climate change even more vital. But rampant science misinformation and polarizing politics make those conversations difficult. How is it possible to improve communication about climate change? How have peoples’ perspectives on climate change evolved as new evidence emerges? And how may perspectives evolve further as the world changes around us?

Panelist:
Edward Maibach, Ph.D.

Professor and Director
George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication

Interviewed by:
Carolyn Gramling
Carolyn Gramling, Ph.D.

Earth and Climate Writer,
Science News

3:30 – 4:15 p.m. ET*

What Black Holes Reveal About the Universe

Black holes are one of the great mysteries of the universe — extreme beasts that lurk at the center of most galaxies and help shape the cosmos. A Nobel Prize winner and co-discoverer of the black hole at the center of the Milky Way explains what astrophysicists want to find out next — and just how amazing black holes are. 

Panelist:
Andrea Ghez, Ph.D.

Professor of Physics and Astronomy
Lauren B. Leichtman & Arthur E. Levine Chair in Astrophysics
Founder and Director of the Galactic Center Group, UCLA

Interviewed by:
Emily Conover, Ph.D.

Senior Writer, Physics,
Science News

* This session includes closing remarks by:
Nancy Shute, Editor in Chief,
Science News


Join us for this exciting event! Register now.


Science News Now is part of our Centennial Celebration, which has been made possible with generous donations from the following sponsors:


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