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Staff Writer

Bethany Brookshire

Science education writer and Scicurious blogger

Bethany Brookshire has a B.S. in biology and a B.A. in philosophy from The College of William and Mary, and a Ph.D. in physiology and pharmacology from Wake Forest University School of Medicine. She is the guest editor of The Open Laboratory Anthology of Science Blogging, 2009, and the winner of the Society for Neuroscience Next Generation Award and the Three Quarks Daily Science Writing Award, among others. She blogs at Eureka! Lab and at Scicurious. You can follow her on Twitter as @scicurious.

Bethany Brookshire's Articles

  • News in Brief

    Bonobos feel the beat

    Some animals, like cockatoos and bonobos, are able to move to the groove. Studying animals that keep the beat might tell us whether musical rhythm is really widespread.
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    Scicurious

    Your epigenetics can be a pain

    A new study shows that your epigenome can play an important role in pain sensitivity, potentially offering a new target that could make development of a more effective painkiller less of a ... pain.

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  • 
    Scicurious

    The fluid part of semen plays a seminal role

    We often think of reproduction as involving only sperm and egg. But a new study highlights the seminal role of liquid semen in fertility and healthy offspring.

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  • 
    Scicurious

    A turkey’s wattle inspires a biosensor’s design

    A group of scientists from the University of California, Berkeley have developed a color-changing biosensor inspired by a turkey’s wattle.

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  • 
    Scicurious

    Caffeine’s little memory jolt garners a lot of excitement

    A new study claims that caffeine can perk up memory consolidation in students without a caffeine habit. But concerns about the effect size and the statistics in the paper require a little extra shot of replication.

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  • 
    Scicurious

    Sweet potato weevils have favorite colors

    When it comes to eradicating the sweet potato weevil, the devil is in the colorful details.

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  • 
    Scicurious

    All mice are the same, until they're not

    A new study shows substantial differences in how two closely related mouse strains respond to drugs. It offers new options for linking genes and behavior and may change how scientists think about the similarity of their mouse strains.

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    Scicurious

    When stressed, the brain goes ‘cheap’

    A new study shows that stress makes you go with your gut, biasing your decisions against the more “expensive” method of thinking things through.

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  • 
    Scicurious

    You are what your dad ate, perhaps

    Your development is affected by what your mother ate while she was pregnant with you. Is it also affected by what your father ate? A new study suggests that folate deficiency in dads can affect their offspring through epigenetic changes.

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