Chemistry

More Stories in Chemistry

  1. lead
    Materials Science

    Lead becomes stronger than steel under extreme pressures

    Lead is a soft metal, easily scratched with a fingernail. But that changes dramatically when the metal is compressed under high pressures.

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  2. scandium molecule diagram
    Chemistry

    Molecular jiggling may explain why some solids shrink when heated

    Scientists may have figured out how scandium fluoride crystals shrink as temperature rises, possibly leading to new insights into superconductors.

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  3. whiskey patterns
    Chemistry

    American whiskeys leave unique ‘webs’ when evaporated

    If you don’t have a sophisticated palate, it turns out you can distinguish among bourbons with a microscope.

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  4. John B. Goodenough, M. Stanley Whittingham and Akira Yoshino
    Chemistry

    The development of the lithium-ion battery has won the chemistry Nobel Prize

    Three scientists have won the 2019 Nobel Prize in chemistry for helping create lithium-ion batteries, which power everyday devices from smartphones to electric cars.

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  5. SN 10 illustration
    Science & Society

    This year’s SN 10 enjoy the journey, not just the discovery

    Meet 10 young researchers who combine persistence and passion to make headway on science’s big questions.

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  6. Brett McGuire
    Chemistry

    Brett McGuire searches space for the chemistry of life

    The complex molecules Brett McGuire has discovered in interstellar space may point to the origins of carbon-based life.

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  7. Michelle O’Malley
    Life

    Michelle O’Malley seeks greener chemistry through elusive fungi

    Michelle O’Malley studies anaerobic gut fungi, microbes that could help make chemicals and fuels from sustainable sources.

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  8. ancient baby bottles
    Archaeology

    Baby bottles may go back millennia in Europe

    Europe’s early farmers used spouted vessels to wean infants, an analysis of residue from animal milk left in the containers suggests.

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  9. plastic revolver
    Science & Society

    3-D printed ‘ghost guns’ pose new challenges for crime-scene investigators

    Researchers are analyzing the ballistics of 3-D printed guns and the plastic they leave behind to help forensic scientists track these DIY weapons.

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