Life

More Stories in Life

  1. Asian giant hornet
    Life

    More ‘murder hornets’ are turning up. Here’s what you need to know

    Two more specimens of the world’s largest hornet have just been found in North America.

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  2. APOE protein model
    Genetics

    Genetic risk factors for Alzheimer’s also raise the risk of getting COVID-19

    People who have the APOE4 genetic variant appear to be more vulnerable to the disease, but it’s unclear why.

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  3. Acropora corals in New Caledonia
    Life

    Neon colors may help some corals stage a comeback from bleaching

    When some corals bleach, they turn bright colors. Stunning hues may be part of a response that helps the corals recover and reunite with their algae.

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  4. four brightly colored, fuzzy-looking critters
    Animals

    New species of scaly, deep-sea worms named after Elvis have been found

    A genetic analysis sheds new light on funky scale worms with glittery, scales reminiscent of sequins on the “The King’s” iconic jumpsuits.

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  5. Neuroscience

    How coronavirus stress may scramble our brains

    The pandemic has made clear thinking a real struggle. But researchers say knowing how stress affects the brain can help people cope.

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  6. bumblebee
    Life

    Pollen-deprived bumblebees may speed up plant blooming by biting leaves

    In a pollen shortage, some bees nick holes in tomato leaves that accelerate flowering, and pollen production, by weeks.

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  7. Siberia’s Selenga River
    Genetics

    The oldest genetic link between Asians and Native Americans was found in Siberia

    DNA from a fragment of a 14,000-year-old tooth suggests that Native Americans have widespread Asian ancestry.

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  8. a marine parchment tube worm glows blue against a black background
    Chemistry

    Here’s a clue to how this tube worm’s slime can glow blue for days

    Mucus oozed by a marine tube worm can glow for up to 72 hours. New results suggest that the light may sustain itself through some clever chemistry.

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  9. anchovy ancestor
    Paleontology

    Saber-toothed anchovy relatives hunted in the sea 50 million years ago

    Unlike today’s plankton-eating anchovies with tiny teeth, ancient anchovy kin had lower jaw of sharp spikes paired with a single giant sabertooth.

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