Life

More Stories in Life

  1. mouse intestine
    Health & Medicine

    Full intestines, more than full stomachs, may tell mice to stop eating

    A new description of stretch-sensing nerve endings in mice’s intestines could lead to ways to treat obesity.

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  2. Humpback whale
    Animals

    Humpback whales in the South Atlantic have recovered from near-extinction

    A new count shows the population off Brazil went from about 450 in the 1950s to some 25,000 today.

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  3. kids holding trees to plant
    Climate

    5 things to know about fighting climate change by planting trees

    One group’s idea of planting vast swaths of trees to curb climate change exaggerates the proposal’s power to trap carbon, some argue.

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  4. jaw bone
    Animals

    A tooth fossil shows Gigantopithecus’ close ties to modern orangutans

    Proteins from the past help clarify how an ancient Asian ape that was larger than a full-grown, modern male gorilla evolved.

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  5. filefish
    Earth

    Plastics outnumber baby fish 7-to-1 in some coastal nurseries

    Ocean slicks serve as calm, food-rich nurseries for larval fish. A new study shows that slicks also accumulate plastics, which get eaten by baby fish.

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  6. Florida carpenter ants
    Animals

    Flipping a molecular switch can turn warrior ants into foragers

    Toggling one protein soon after hatching makes Florida carpenter ants turn from fighting to hunting for food.

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  7. honeybee
    Animals

    Power lines may mess with honeybees’ behavior and ability to learn

    Under power lines, honeybees might suffer neurological effects from exposure to electromagnetic fields.

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  8. silver-backed chevrotain
    Animals

    Silver-backed chevrotains have been ‘rediscovered’ by science after 29 years

    With help from Vietnamese villagers, researchers captured photos of a species of deerlike ungulate thought lost to science nearly three decades ago.

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  9. Self-destructing mitochondria
    Life

    Self-destructing mitochondria may leave some brain cells vulnerable to ALS

    Mitochondria that appear to dismantle themselves in certain brain cells may be a first step toward ALS, a mouse study suggests.

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