Life

More Stories in Life

  1. a microscopic image of Naegleria fowleri
    Microbes

    50 years ago, scientists were on the trail of a brain-eating amoeba

    In 1970, scientists were studying a brain-eating amoeba that had been implicated in a newfound disease. Today, infections by the parasite are still poorly understood.

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  2. illustration on an ancient Lystrosaurus
    Paleontology

    Ancient Lystrosaurus tusks may show the oldest signs of a hibernation-like state

    Oddball ancestors of mammals called Lystrosaurus might have slowed way down during polar winters.

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  3. tobacco hawkmoth drinking from a plant
    Environment

    This moth may outsmart smog by learning to like pollution-altered aromas

    In the lab, scientists taught tobacco hawkmoths that a scent changed by ozone is from a favorite flower.

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  4. New Zealand wine grape field
    Agriculture

    How does a crop’s environment shape a food’s smell and taste?

    Scientific explorations of terroir — the soil, climate and orientation in which crops grow — hint at influences on flavors and aromas.

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  5. black metaltail hummingbird
    Animals

    This hummingbird survives cold nights by nearly freezing itself solid

    To survive cold Andean nights, the black metaltail saves energy by cooling itself to record-low temperatures, entering a state of suspended animation.

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  6. image of a sea butterfly on a black background
    Animals

    Sea butterflies’ shells determine how the snails swim

    New aquarium videos show that sea butterflies of various shapes and sizes flutter through water differently.

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  7. map of Earth's protected areas
    Ecosystems

    Protecting half the planet could help solve climate change and save species

    An analysis lays out where new land protections could complement existing protected areas to achieve various conservation and climate goals.

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  8. dodder plant with orange stems
    Life

    This parasitic plant eavesdrops on its host to know when to flower

    Dodder plants have no leaves to sense when to bloom, so the parasites rely on a chemical cue from their hosts instead.

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  9. Jiankui He
    Genetics

    Strict new guidelines lay out a path to heritable human gene editing

    But scientists say making changes in DNA that can be passed on to future generations still isn’t safe and effective, yet.

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