Life

More Stories in Life

  1. A beaver in a cage, partially submerged in water and surrounded by grass
    Animals

    Relocated beavers helped mitigate some effects of climate change

    Along a river in Washington state, the repositioned beavers built dams that lowered stream temperatures and boosted water storage.

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  2. three sequence images of a syringe stuck in a dead wolf spider as it picks up a spider corpse
    Tech

    Scientists turned dead spiders into robots

    In a new field dubbed “necrobotics,” researchers used a syringe and some superglue to control the dead bodies of wolf spiders.

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  3. side-by-side microscope images of pigs’ kidneys with actin highlighted in green
    Neuroscience

    An hour after pigs’ deaths, an artificial system restored cellular life

    Sensors, pumps and artificial fluid staved off tissue damage in pigs after cardiac arrest. The system may one day preserve organs for transplantation.

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  4. photo of Michel Roccati standing and using a walker as a researcher monitors his progress on an tablet
    Neuroscience

    Spinal stimulation gives some people with paralysis more freedom

    Methods that stimulate the spine with electrodes promise to improve the lives of people with spinal cord injuries, in ways that go well beyond walking.

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  5. A red lionfish with fins spread wide next to bright red coral
    Animals

    How slow and steady lionfish win the race against fast prey

    Lionfish overcome speedy prey with persistent pursuit, waiting for the perfect moment to strike. Other slow predatory fish may use the technique too.

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  6. Tropical fish biologist Mark Meekan, in a dive suit, swims near the nose of a whale shark.
    Animals

    Whale sharks may be the world’s largest omnivores

    An analysis of the sharks’ skin shows that the animals eat and digest algae.

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  7. microscope image of tiny Dictyostelium discoideum amoebas shown as dots forming larger blobs
    Health & Medicine

    Tiny amoebas move faster when carrying cargo than without

    A new study of the carrying capacity of single-celled amoebas may help scientists develop mini “trucks” to precisely target disease in the human body.

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  8. dark field microscope images of long, thin cable bacteria filaments
    Environment

    Electrical bacteria may help clean oil spills and curb methane emissions

    Cable bacteria are living electrical wires that may become a tool to reduce methane emissions and clean oil spills.

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  9. A small crustacean, Idotea balthica, that looks like a small clawless lobster, climbs along a stalk of red algae
    Life

    Like bees of the sea, crustaceans ‘pollinate’ seaweed

    Crustaceans shuttle around red algae’s sex cells, helping the seaweed reproduce in a manner remarkably similar to flower pollination.

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