Anthropology

More Stories in Anthropology

  1. preserved nerve cells
    Anthropology

    These human nerve cell tendrils turned to glass nearly 2,000 years ago

    Part of a young man’s brain was preserved in A.D. 79 by hot ash from Mount Vesuvius’ eruption.

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  2. scientists collecting cave samples
    Anthropology

    The first Denisovan DNA outside Siberia unveils a long stint on the roof of the world

    Genetic evidence puts Denisovans, humankind’s now-extinct cousins, on the Tibetan Plateau from 100,000 to at least 60,000 years ago.

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  3. Mummified llama head from Inca sacrifices
    Anthropology

    Mummified llamas yield new insights into Inca ritual sacrifices

    Bound and decorated llamas, found at an Inca site in southern Peru, may have been buried alive as part of events in annexed territories.

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  4. ancient bone tool
    Anthropology

    Homo erectus, not humans, may have invented the barbed bone point

    Carved artifacts excavated from Tanzania’s Olduvai Gorge suggest now-extinct hominids made barbed bone points long before humans did, researchers say.

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  5. workers standing at a drilling site in Kenya's Koora basin
    Anthropology

    How environmental changes may have helped make ancient humans more adaptable

    An East African sediment core unveils ecological changes underlying a key Stone Age transition.

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  6. Neandertal partial skeleton
    Anthropology

    Neandertal babies had stocky chests like their parents

    Our evolutionary relatives may have inherited short, deep rib cages from their ancient ancestors.

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  7. bones from ancient Iberian massacre
    Archaeology

    Bones from an Iron Age massacre paint a violent picture of prehistoric Europe

    Bones left unburied, and in one case still wearing jewelry, after a massacre add to evidence that prehistoric Europe was a violent place.

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  8. Ancient human footprints from the Arabian Peninsula
    Anthropology

    Seven footprints may be the oldest evidence of humans on the Arabian Peninsula

    In what’s now desert, people and other animals stopped to drink at a lake more than 100,000 years ago, a new study suggests.

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  9. photo of a gibbon looking at the camera
    Anthropology

    A stray molar is the oldest known fossil from an ancient gibbon

    A newly described tooth puts ancestors of these small-bodied apes in India roughly 13 million years ago.

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