Anthropology

More Stories in Anthropology

  1. virtual reconstruction of child's bones
    Anthropology

    A child’s 78,000-year-old grave marks Africa’s oldest known human burial

    Cave excavation of a youngster’s grave pushes back the date of the first human burial identified in the continent by at least a few thousand years.

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  2. Little Foot hominid skeleton photographed from above
    Anthropology

    Little Foot’s shoulders hint at how a human-chimp common ancestor climbed

    The shape of the 3.67-million-year-old hominid’s shoulder blades suggests it had a gorilla-like ability to climb trees.

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  3. scientists in Estatuas cave
    Humans

    Neandertal DNA from cave mud shows two waves of migration across Eurasia

    Genetic material left behind in sediments reveals new details about how ancient humans once spread across the continent.

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  4. crowd of Japanese commuters wearing masks
    Anthropology

    A coronavirus epidemic may have hit East Asia about 25,000 years ago

    An ancient viral outbreak may have left a genetic mark in East Asians that possibly influences their responses to the virus that causes COVID-19.

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  5. Series of walking skeletons
    Anthropology

    ‘First Steps’ shows how bipedalism led humans down a strange evolutionary path

    In a new book, a paleoanthropologist argues that walking upright has had profound effects on human anatomy and behavior.

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  6. models of an early human skull and an apelike skull with brains highlighted in blue
    Anthropology

    Ancient humans may have had apelike brains even after leaving Africa

    Modern humanlike brains may have evolved surprisingly late, about 1.7 million years ago, a new study suggests.

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  7. human skull from early humans in Europe
    Genetics

    Europe’s oldest known humans mated with Neandertals surprisingly often

    DNA from ancient fossils suggests interbreeding regularly occurred between the two species by about 45,000 years ago, two studies find.

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  8. parent working on a computer while child makes a funny face in the background
    Science & Society

    Parents in Western countries report the highest levels of burnout

    The first survey comparing parental exhaustion across 42 countries links it to a culture of self-reliance.

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  9. sheepskin parchment deed
    Anthropology

    How using sheepskin for legal papers may have prevented fraud

    Removing fat is key to turning animal skin into parchment. With sheepskin, the process creates a writing surface easily marred by scratched-out words.

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