Genetics

More Stories in Genetics

  1. mosquito
    Animals

    50 years ago, scientists were genetically modifying mosquitoes

    In 1971, scientists turned to genetics to control disease-spreading mosquitoes without DDT. Today, there are a variety of pesticide-free methods.

    By
  2. an illustration of viruses attacking a rod-shaped bacterium
    Microbes

    A bacteria-virus arms race could lead to a new way to treat shigellosis

    As bacteria that cause shigellosis evolve to escape a virus, the microbes may become less deadly, a hopeful sign for “phage therapy.”

    By
  3. a photo showing a fossilized aprtial jaw and braincase
    Anthropology

    2021 research reinforced that mating across groups drove human evolution

    Fossils and DNA point to mixing and mingling among Homo groups across vast areas.

    By
  4. image of vulture bees on a piece of chicken
    Animals

    Gut bacteria let vulture bees eat rotting flesh without getting sick

    Acid-producing bacteria in the gut of vulture bees let these “weirdos of the bee world” safely snack on animal carcasses.

    By
  5. Genetically engineered glow-in-the-dark fish
    Life

    ‘Life as We Made It’ charts the past and future of genetic tinkering

    A new book shatters illusions that human meddling with nature has only just begun.

    By
  6. illustration of coronaviruses
    Microbes

    Are viruses alive, not alive or something in between? And why does it matter?

    The way we talk about viruses can shift scientific research and our understanding of evolution.

    By
  7. Mourning gecko
    Life

    Gene-edited stem cells help geckos regrow more perfect tails

    Regenerated gecko tails are a far cry from perfect. Now experiments have coaxed geckos to regrow better ones with nerve tissue and bonelike cartilage.

    By
  8. The head and neck of a naturally mummified woman with long dark hair, wearing a white hat
    Genetics

    DNA from mysterious Asian mummies reveals their surprising ancestry

    Ancient DNA indicates that an enigmatic Bronze Age group consisted of genetic, but not cultural, loners.

    By
  9. two Siberian sled dogs
    Archaeology

    Dog DNA reveals ancient trade network connecting the Arctic to the outside world

    People in Siberia were exchanging canines and probably other goods as early as 7,000 years ago with cultures as far off as Europe and the Near East.

    By