Psychology

More Stories in Psychology

  1. crowd of people screaming with joy
    Neuroscience

    Surprisingly, humans recognize joyful screams faster than fearful screams

    Scientists believed we evolved to respond to alarming screams faster than non-alarming ones, but experiments show our brains may be wired differently.

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  2. Lego staircase
    Psychology

    People add by default even when subtraction makes more sense

    People default to addition when solving puzzles and problems, even when subtraction works better. That could underlie some modern-day excesses.

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  3. parent working on a computer while child makes a funny face in the background
    Science & Society

    Parents in Western countries report the highest levels of burnout

    The first survey comparing parental exhaustion across 42 countries links it to a culture of self-reliance.

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  4. a little Black girl getting a peach-tented bandaid from a nurse
    Health & Medicine

    Redefining ‘flesh-colored’ bandages makes medicine more inclusive

    Peach-colored bandages label dark-skinned patients as outside the norm, says med student Linda Oyesiku. Brown bandages expand who gets to be normal.

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  5. Jesse Laney and other ecologists on a birdwatching trip
    Animals

    A rare bird sighting doesn’t lead to seeing more kinds of rare birds

    The idea that more kinds of rare birds are seen when birders flock to where one has been seen, the so-called Patagonia Picnic Table Effect, is a myth.

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  6. woman looking bored at a laptop
    Psychology

    In the social distancing era, boredom may pose a public health threat

    Boredom contributes to pandemic fatigue and may account for why some people don’t follow social distancing rules.

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  7. masked student looking at a computer
    Psychology

    The COVID-19 pandemic made U.S. college students’ mental health even worse

    College students struggled with mental health problems before the pandemic. Now, some vulnerable students are even more at risk.

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  8. Bonobos grooming
    Animals

    Bonobos, much like humans, show commitment to completing a joint task

    Experiments with bonobos suggest that humans aren’t the only ones who can feel a sense of mutual responsibility toward other members of their species.

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  9. woman inside wearing mask
    Neuroscience

    Lonely brains crave people like hungry brains crave food

    After hours of isolation, dopamine-producing cells in the brain fire up in response to pictures of humans, showing our social side runs deep.

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