Archaeology

More Stories in Archaeology

  1. rock with fossilized human footprints
    Anthropology

    ‘Ghost tracks’ suggest people came to the Americas earlier than once thought

    Prehistoric people’s footprints show that humans were in North America during the height of the last ice age, researchers say.

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  2. image of a row of statues on Easter Island
    Genetics

    DNA offers a new look at how Polynesia was settled

    Modern genetic evidence suggests that statue builders on islands such as Rapa Nui, also known as Easter Island, had a shared ancestry.

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  3. an ancient hide scraping tool shown at three different angles
    Archaeology

    Stone Age people used bone scrapers to make leather and pelts

    African cave finds include remains of skinned creatures and hide scrapers made from animal ribs.

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  4. skull bones from an ancient Indonesian woman
    Anthropology

    Ancient DNA shows the peopling of Southeast Asian islands was surprisingly complex

    Ancient DNA from a hunter-gatherer skeleton points to earlier-than-expected human arrivals on Southeast Asian islands known as Wallacea.

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  5. Archaeology

    A 1,000-year-old grave may have held a powerful nonbinary person

    A medieval grave in Finland, once thought to maybe hold a respected woman warrior, may belong to someone who didn’t have a strictly male or female identity.

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  6. skeleton of an ancient shark attack victim at an excavation site
    Anthropology

    A skeleton from Peru vies for the title of oldest known shark attack victim

    The 6,000-year-old remains of a teen with a missing leg and tell-tale bite marks came to light after news of a 3,000-year-old victim in Japan surfaced.

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  7. two researchers, one holding a torch in a dark cave
    Humans

    How wielding lamps and torches shed new light on Stone Age cave art

    Experiments with stone lamps and juniper branch torches are helping scientists see 12,500-year-old cave art with fresh eyes.

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  8. fossil of human jawbone
    Humans

    Ancient human bones reveal the oldest known strain of the plague

    The earliest known plague strain emerged about 7,100 years ago and was less contagious as the one behind Black Death — but was still deadly.

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  9. jaw and skull bones from the Nesher Ramla site on a white background
    Anthropology

    Israeli fossil finds reveal a new hominid group, Nesher Ramla Homo

    Discoveries reveal a new Stone Age population that had close ties to Homo sapiens at least 120,000 years ago, complicating the human family tree.

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