Archaeology

  1. Stonehenge monument seen from above
    Archaeology

    Stonehenge may have had roots in a Welsh stone circle

    Ancient migrants to southern England brought the makings of the iconic monument with them, researchers suspect.

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  2. ancient seashell
    Archaeology

    Humans made a horn out of a conch shell about 18,000 years ago

    Ancient find may have sounded off during rituals in a cave adorned with wall art.

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  3. ancient Egyptian mummy sarcophagus and mud shell
    Archaeology

    An ancient Egyptian mummy was wrapped in an unusual mud shell

    Commoners in ancient Egypt may have used mud in place of expensive resin to imitate royal mummification techniques.

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  4. round stone, the oldest known abrading tool
    Archaeology

    The oldest known abrading tool was used around 350,000 years ago

    A flat-ended rock found in an Israeli cave marks an early technological shift by human ancestors to make stone tools for grinding rather than cutting.

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  5. Indonesian cave
    Archaeology

    One of the oldest known cave paintings has been found in Indonesia

    A drawing of a pig on the island of Sulawesi dates to at least 45,500 years ago.

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  6. African elephant with trunk in air
    Archaeology

    Ivory from a 16th century shipwreck reveals new details about African elephants

    Ivory from the sunken Portuguese trading ship Bom Jesus contains clues about elephant herds that once roamed Africa, and the people who hunted them.

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  7. Lava tube in New Mexico
    Archaeology

    Ancient people may have survived desert droughts by melting ice in lava tubes

    Bands of charcoal from fires lit long ago, found in an ice core from a New Mexico cave, correspond to five periods of drought over 800 years.

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  8. stone with microscopic bone residue
    Archaeology

    Two stones fuel debate over when America’s first settlers arrived

    Stones possibly used to break mastodon bones 130,000 years ago in what is now California get fresh scrutiny.

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  9. dugout canoe crafted using axes modeled off of Japanese artifacts
    Humans

    Ancient humans may have deliberately voyaged to Japan’s Ryukyu Islands

    Satellite-tracked buoys suggest that long ago, a remote Japanese archipelago was reached by explorers on purpose, not accidentally.

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  10. David and Goliath illustration
    Archaeology

    The biblical warrior Goliath may not have been so giant after all

    Archaeological finds suggest the width of the walls of Goliath’s home city were used to metaphorically represent the Old Testament figure’s height.

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  11. an illustration of a woman throwing a spear
    Anthropology

    Female big-game hunters may have been surprisingly common in the ancient Americas

    A Peruvian burial that indicates that women speared large prey as early as 9,000 years ago sheds new light on gender roles of ancient hunter-gatherers.

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  12. preserved nerve cells
    Anthropology

    These human nerve cell tendrils turned to glass nearly 2,000 years ago

    Part of a young man’s brain was preserved in A.D. 79 by hot ash from Mount Vesuvius’ eruption.

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