Animals

More Stories in Animals

  1. Volta's electric eel
    Animals

    Some electric eels coordinate attacks to zap their prey

    Electric eels were thought be to solitary hunters, until researchers observed over 100 eels hunting together, releasing coordinated electric attacks on corralled prey.

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  2. crested rats
    Plants

    Rats with poisonous hairdos live surprisingly sociable private lives

    Deadly, swaggering rodents purr and snuggle when they’re with mates and young.

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  3. megalodon shark jaws
    Paleontology

    Newborn megalodon sharks were larger than most adult humans

    Preserved pieces of backbone suggest that megalodon sharks were about 2 meters long at birth.

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  4. mice cuddling
    Neuroscience

    Mice may ‘catch’ each other’s pain — and pain relief

    Healthy mice mirror a companion’s pain or morphine-induced relief. Disrupting certain connections in the brain turns off such empathetic behaviors.

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  5. Brown tree snake
    Animals

    Brown tree snakes use their tails as lassos to climb wide trees

    A never-before-seen climbing technique could inspire the creation of new serpentine robots to navigate difficult terrains.

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  6. huntsman spider on a branch
    Animals

    These spiders may sew leaves into fake shelters to lure frogs to their doom

    Madagascar’s huntsman spiders use silk to turn two leaves into a cool hollow. Such microhabitats may appeal to the spiders’ prey, a study suggests.

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  7. Asian giant hornet
    Animals

    Rumors of a ‘murder hornet’ apocalypse may have been exaggerated

    Murder hornets sightings in the Pacific northwest inspired a mix of concern and delight.

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  8. Malawi rice paddies
    Animals

    Clearing land to feed a growing human population will threaten thousands of species

    Changing where, how and what food is grown could largely avoid biodiversity losses, scientists say.

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  9. Bonobos grooming
    Animals

    Bonobos, much like humans, show commitment to completing a joint task

    Experiments with bonobos suggest that humans aren’t the only ones who can feel a sense of mutual responsibility toward other members of their species.

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