Animals

More Stories in Animals

  1. black metaltail hummingbird
    Animals

    This hummingbird survives cold nights by nearly freezing itself solid

    To survive cold Andean nights, the black metaltail saves energy by cooling itself to record-low temperatures, entering a state of suspended animation.

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  2. image of a sea butterfly on a black background
    Animals

    Sea butterflies’ shells determine how the snails swim

    New aquarium videos show that sea butterflies of various shapes and sizes flutter through water differently.

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  3. flamboyant cuttlefish
    Animals

    Flamboyant cuttlefish save their bright patterns for flirting, fighting and fleeing

    A new field study of flamboyant cuttlefish shows they don’t always live up to their reputation.

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  4. a female hyena and her cub
    Animals

    Female hyenas kill off cubs in their own clans

    Along with starvation and mauling by lions, infanticide leads as a cause of hyena cub death. Such killings may serve to enforce the social order.

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  5. Aedes aegypti
    Animals

    Genetically modified mosquitoes have been OK’d for a first U.S. test flight

    After a decade of heated debate, free-flying swarms aimed at shrinking dengue-carrying mosquito populations gets a nod for 2021 in the Florida Keys.

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  6. photos of three mummified animals
    Archaeology

    X-rays reveal what ancient animal mummies keep under wraps

    A new method of 3-D scanning mummified animals reveals life and death details for a snake, a bird and a cat.

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  7. Dingo from Australia
    Animals

    Culling dingoes with poison may be making them bigger

    Meat laced with toxic powder has been used for decades to kill dingoes. Now, dingoes in baited areas are changing: They’re getting bigger.

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  8. illustration of a woolly rhino
    Life

    Climate change, not hunters, may have killed off woolly rhinos

    Ancient DNA indicates that numbers of woolly rhinos held steady long after people arrived on the scene.

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  9. dozens of locusts flying around in the desert
    Life

    A single molecule may entice normally solitary locusts to form massive swarms

    Scientists pinpoint a compound emitted by locusts that could inform new ways of controlling the pests.

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