Environment

More Stories in Environment

  1. microplastic particles
    Tech

    Tiny magnetic coils could help break down microplastic pollution

    Carbon nanotubes designed to release plastic-eroding chemicals could clear the long-lasting trash from waterways.

    By
  2. Particle Physics

    How a 2017 radioactive plume may be tied to Russia and nixed neutrino research

    A botched attempt at producing radioactive material needed for a neutrino experiment may have released ruthenium-106 to the atmosphere in 2017.

    By
  3. solar panels
    Tech

    This solar-powered device produces energy and cleans water at the same time

    Someday, the two-for-one machine could help curb electricity and freshwater shortages.

    By
  4. fishing boats
    Oceans

    The world’s fisheries are incredibly intertwined, thanks to baby fish

    A computer simulation reveals how one nation's management of its fish spawning grounds could significantly help or hurt another country's catch.

    By
  5. Langoustine claws
    Chemistry

    How seafood shells could help solve the plastic waste problem

    Chitin and chitosan from crustacean shells could put a dent in the world’s plastic waste problem.

    By
  6. Odaw River
    Ecosystems

    Many of the world’s rivers are flush with dangerous levels of antibiotics

    Antibiotic pollution can fuel drug resistance in microbes. A global survey of rivers finds unsafe levels of antibiotics in 16 percent of sites.

    By
  7. Sinclair Lake
    Environment

    Some Canadian lakes still store DDT in their mud

    Yesterday’s DDT pollution crisis is still today’s problem in some of Canada’s lakes.

    By
  8. microplastics
    Oceans

    Tiny plastic debris is accumulating far beneath the ocean surface

    Floating trash patches scratch only the surface of the ocean microplastic pollution problem.

    By
  9. compostable food containers
    Environment

    Chemicals in biodegradable food containers can leach into compost

    PFAS compounds from compostable food containers could end being absorbed by plants and later eaten by people, though the health effects are unclear.

    By