Microbes

More Stories in Microbes

  1. Mouse mom with pups
    Neuroscience

    A mother mouse’s gut microbes help wire her pup’s brain

    The pups of mice lacking gut microbes, and the compounds they make, have altered nerve cells in part of the brain and a lowered sensitivity to touch.

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  2. a microscopic image of Naegleria fowleri
    Microbes

    50 years ago, scientists were on the trail of a brain-eating amoeba

    In 1970, scientists were studying a brain-eating amoeba that had been implicated in a newfound disease. Today, infections by the parasite are still poorly understood.

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  3. New Zealand wine grape field
    Agriculture

    How does a crop’s environment shape a food’s smell and taste?

    Scientific explorations of terroir — the soil, climate and orientation in which crops grow — hint at influences on flavors and aromas.

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  4. International Space Station
    Microbes

    If bacteria band together, they can survive for years in space

    Tiny clumps of bacteria can survive at least three years in outer space, raising the prospect of interplanetary travel by microbial life.

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  5. Bacteria that eat manganese
    Microbes

    Scientists stumbled across the first known manganese-fueled bacteria

    A jar left soaking in an office sink helped scientists answer a century-old question of whether bacteria can use manganese for energy.

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  6. Lactobacillus bacteria
    Life

    Scientists want to build a Noah’s Ark for the human microbiome

    Just as the Svalbard Global Seed Vault protects global crop diversity, the Microbiota Vault may one day protect the microbes on and in our bodies.

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  7. Microscopic springtail
    Animals

    Earthy funk lures tiny creatures to eat and spread bacterial spores

    Genes that cue spore growth also kick up a scent that draws in springtails.

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  8. one-celled algae with flagella
    Life

    Algae use flagella to trot, gallop and move with gaits all their own

    Single-celled microalgae, with no brains, can coordinate their “limbs” into a trot or fancier gait.

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  9. Prometheoarchaeum syntrophicum
    Life

    Microbiologists took 12 years to grow a microbe tied to complex life’s origins

    Years of lab work resulted in growing a type of archaea that might help scientists understand one of evolution’s giant leaps toward complexity.

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