Neuroscience

More Stories in Neuroscience

  1. image of foods in the Mediterranean diet
    Health & Medicine

    How scientists are shifting their search for links between diet and dementia

    Studies of food’s impact on Alzheimer’s disease and dementia are hampered by complexity. Scientists hope new research approaches prove more fruitful.

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  2. Glia cell in mouse spleen
    Neuroscience

    Glial cells may take on big jobs in unexpected parts of the body

    Scientists are finding mysterious glia in the heart, spleen and lungs and wonder what they’re doing there.

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  3. Two musk oxen stand in the snow, about to butt heads.
    Neuroscience

    Headbutts hurt the brain, even for a musk ox

    Though musk oxen are built to bash, a study of the headbutters turned up signs of brain damage. But that may not be catastrophic for the bovids.

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  4. image of three flags at half mask in front of the U.S. capitol building
    Science & Society

    COVID-19 has killed a million Americans. Our minds can’t comprehend that number

    We intuitively compare large, approximate quantities but cannot grasp such a big, abstract number as a million U.S. COVID-19 deaths.

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  5. Marmoset carrying two babies on its back
    Animals

    Baby marmosets may practice their first distinctive cries in the womb

    Ultrasounds tracking fetal mouth movements in baby marmosets pinpoint the early development of the motor skills needed for vocalization.

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  6. microscope image showing brain cells with dopamine in green and active AGTR1 gene in magenta
    Neuroscience

    A very specific kind of brain cell dies off in people with Parkinson’s

    Of out 10 kinds of dopamine-making nerve cells, only one type is extra vulnerable in Parkinson’s disease.

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  7. a mom looking at her daughter, who is looking annoyed while holding a phone
    Neuroscience

    Mom’s voice holds a special place in kids’ brains. That changes for teens

    Unfamiliar voices hold special appeal for teens, a sign of a shift from a focus on mostly family to wider networks, brain scans suggest.

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  8. aerial photo of a grid of streets in Chicago
    Humans

    Where you grew up may shape your navigational skills

    People raised in cities with simple, gridlike layouts were worse at navigating in a video game designed for studying the brain.

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  9. apparatus of the Daya Bay experiment, with shiny orbs attached to long walls
    Science & Society

    Here are the Top 10 times scientific imagination failed

    Some scientists of the past couldn’t imagine that atoms or gravity waves could one day be studied – or nuclear energy harnessed.

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