Neuroscience

More Stories in Neuroscience

  1. man sitting in a chair receives an infusion of aducanumab
    Health & Medicine

    FDA approved a new Alzheimer’s drug despite controversy over whether it works

    A new Alzheimer's treatment slows progression of the disease, the drug’s developers say. But some researchers question its effectiveness.

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  2. side by side images of a yellow, anchor-shaped object
    Chemistry

    A sweet father-son bond inspires tasty new molecule models

    New edible models of proteins could spark students’ interest in the world of chemistry, especially students who are blind.

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  3. person playing brain training game on smartphone
    Neuroscience

    Playing brain training games regularly doesn’t boost brainpower

    Comparing brain training program users with those who don’t do the mini brain workouts, scientists found no proof that the regimens boosted brainpower.

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  4. A side view of a man wearing an EEG cap and dark goggles
    Genetics

    A gene-based therapy partially restored a blind man’s vision

    Light-activated proteins inserted in eye nerve cells and special goggles help the man, who lost his sight due to retinitis pigmentosa, see objects.

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  5. mouse drinking water
    Animals

    Mammal brains may use the same circuits to control tongues and limbs

    When mice drink water, they make corrective motions with their tongues that resemble similar adjustments made by primates when they grab for objects.

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  6. an illustration depicting a person thinking about writing the word "hello" and "hello" appears on a computer screen
    Neuroscience

    Brain implants turn imagined handwriting into text on a screen

    A person who was paralyzed from the neck down was able to communicate, thanks to brain-to-text technology.

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  7. a long, thin electronic device with microchips in the middle and lights at either end
    Neuroscience

    Scientists remotely controlled the social behavior of mice with light

    New devices — worn as headsets and backpacks — rely on optogenetics, in which bursts of light toggle neurons, to control mouse brain activity.

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  8. illustration of a brain with parts stimulated highlighted in red and yellow
    Neuroscience

    Mild zaps to the brain can boost a pain-relieving placebo effect

    By sending electric current into the brain, scientists can enhance the pain-relieving placebo effect and dampen the pain-inducing nocebo effect.

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  9. crowd of people screaming with joy
    Neuroscience

    Surprisingly, humans recognize joyful screams faster than fearful screams

    Scientists believed we evolved to respond to alarming screams faster than non-alarming ones, but experiments show our brains may be wired differently.

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