Neuroscience

More Stories in Neuroscience

  1. Biogen headquarters
    Neuroscience

    FDA advisory panel declines to support a controversial Alzheimer’s treatment

    The fate of an Alzheimer’s drug, developed by pharmaceutical company Biogen, remains up in the air.

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  2. Neogobius melanostomus
    Animals

    A fish’s fins may be as sensitive to touch as fingertips

    Newfound parallels between fins and fingers suggest that touch-sensing limbs evolved early, setting the stage for a shared way to sense surroundings.

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  3. preserved nerve cells
    Anthropology

    These human nerve cell tendrils turned to glass nearly 2,000 years ago

    Part of a young man’s brain was preserved in A.D. 79 by hot ash from Mount Vesuvius’ eruption.

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  4. Ogre-faced spider
    Life

    Ogre-faced spiders catch insects out of the air using sound instead of sight

    A new study finds that ogre-faced spiders can hear a surprisingly wide range of sounds.

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  5. dog looking at human
    Neuroscience

    Your dog’s brain doesn’t care about your face

    Comparing brain scans of people and pups shows that faces hold no special meaning to the brains of dogs, a new study suggests.

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  6. nerve cells and a tiny robot
    Neuroscience

    Tiny, magnetically controlled robots coax nerve cells to grow connections

    Research using microrobots and nerve cells from rats could point to new treatments for people with nerve injuries.

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  7. Mouse mom with pups
    Neuroscience

    A mother mouse’s gut microbes help wire her pup’s brain

    The pups of mice lacking gut microbes, and the compounds they make, have altered nerve cells in part of the brain and a lowered sensitivity to touch.

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  8. mouse eating
    Neuroscience

    Newly discovered cells in mice can sense four of the five tastes

    Some cells in mice can sense bitter, sweet, sour and umami. Without the cells, some flavor signals don’t get to the ultimate tastemaker — the brain.

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  9. patient on life support
    Neuroscience

    New guidance on brain death could ease debate over when life ends

    Brain death can be a tricky concept. Clarity from an international group of doctors may help identify when the brain has stopped working for good.

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