Neuroscience

  1. mouse drinking water
    Animals

    Mammal brains may use the same circuits to control tongues and limbs

    When mice drink water, they make corrective motions with their tongues that resemble similar adjustments made by primates when they grab for objects.

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  2. an illustration depicting a person thinking about writing the word "hello" and "hello" appears on a computer screen
    Neuroscience

    Brain implants turn imagined handwriting into text on a screen

    A person who was paralyzed from the neck down was able to communicate, thanks to brain-to-text technology.

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  3. a long, thin electronic device with microchips in the middle and lights at either end
    Neuroscience

    Scientists remotely controlled the social behavior of mice with light

    New devices — worn as headsets and backpacks — rely on optogenetics, in which bursts of light toggle neurons, to control mouse brain activity.

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  4. illustration of a brain with parts stimulated highlighted in red and yellow
    Neuroscience

    Mild zaps to the brain can boost a pain-relieving placebo effect

    By sending electric current into the brain, scientists can enhance the pain-relieving placebo effect and dampen the pain-inducing nocebo effect.

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  5. crowd of people screaming with joy
    Neuroscience

    Surprisingly, humans recognize joyful screams faster than fearful screams

    Scientists believed we evolved to respond to alarming screams faster than non-alarming ones, but experiments show our brains may be wired differently.

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  6. models of an early human skull and an apelike skull with brains highlighted in blue
    Anthropology

    Ancient humans may have had apelike brains even after leaving Africa

    Modern humanlike brains may have evolved surprisingly late, about 1.7 million years ago, a new study suggests.

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  7. rabbit standing on front paws
    Animals

    A gene defect may make rabbits do handstands instead of hop

    Mutations in a gene typically found throughout the nervous system rob rabbits of their ability to hop. Instead, the animals walk on their front paws.

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  8. a composite image of a person in a wheelchair progressing to walking with a walker
    Health & Medicine

    50 years ago, researchers treated chronic pain with electricity

    In 1971, doctors eased chronic pain by sending electrical impulses to the spinal cord. Fifty years later, improved techniques help paralyzed people walk.

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  9. cat rubbing on a catnip plant
    Neuroscience

    Catnip repels insects. Scientists may have finally found out how

    The plant deters mosquitoes and fruit flies by triggering a chemical receptor that, in other animals, senses pain and itch.

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  10. illustration of a science fiction nanobot brain mesh interface
    Neuroscience

    Three visions of the future, inspired by neuroscience’s past and present

    Three fantastical tales of where neuroscience might take us are based on the progress made by brain researchers in the last 100 years.

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  11. embroidery of pyramidal neurons
    Neuroscience

    Famous brain sketches come to life again as embroideries

    A needlework project pays tribute to the iconic drawings of Spanish neuroscientist Santiago Ramón y Cajal.

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  12. mice cuddling
    Neuroscience

    Mice may ‘catch’ each other’s pain — and pain relief

    Healthy mice mirror a companion’s pain or morphine-induced relief. Disrupting certain connections in the brain turns off such empathetic behaviors.

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