Neuroscience

  1. a mom looking at her daughter, who is looking annoyed while holding a phone
    Neuroscience

    Mom’s voice holds a special place in kids’ brains. That changes for teens

    Unfamiliar voices hold special appeal for teens, a sign of a shift from a focus on mostly family to wider networks, brain scans suggest.

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  2. aerial photo of a grid of streets in Chicago
    Humans

    Where you grew up may shape your navigational skills

    People raised in cities with simple, gridlike layouts were worse at navigating in a video game designed for studying the brain.

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  3. apparatus of the Daya Bay experiment, with shiny orbs attached to long walls
    Science & Society

    Here are the Top 10 times scientific imagination failed

    Some scientists of the past couldn’t imagine that atoms or gravity waves could one day be studied – or nuclear energy harnessed.

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  4. images of the brain from different angles
    Health & Medicine

    What do we mean by ‘COVID-19 changes your brain’?

    The events of our lives are reflected in the size, shape and behavior of our constantly changing brains. The effects of COVID-19 changes aren’t clear.

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  5. Anatomist Santiago Ramón y Cajal
    Neuroscience

    How a scientist-artist transformed our view of the brain

    The book ‘The Brain in Search of Itself’ chronicles the life of Santiago Ramón y Cajal, who discovered that the brain is made up of discrete cells.

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  6. photo of a sleeping mouse in a field
    Neuroscience

    A hit of dopamine sends mice into dreamland

    New results are some of the first to show a trigger for the mysterious shifts between REM and non-REM sleep in mice.

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  7. illustration of a brain inside a head silhouette
    Health & Medicine

    A faulty immune response may be behind lingering brain trouble after COVID-19

    The immune system’s response to even mild cases of COVID-19 can affect the brain, preliminary studies suggest.

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  8. image of a cheese grater with a smiley face
    Neuroscience

    Americans tend to assume imaginary faces are male

    When people see imaginary faces in everyday objects, those faces are more likely to be perceived as male, a new study shows.

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  9. illustration of a skeleton with the nervous system highlighted
    Neuroscience

    ‘Feeling & Knowing’ explores the origin and evolution of consciousness

    In the book Feeling & Knowing, neuroscientist Antonio Damasio suggests that consciousness evolved as a way to keep essential bodily systems steady.

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  10. an illustration of connectiosn between neurons
    Neuroscience

    50 years ago, scientists were on the trail of ‘memory molecules’

    In the 1970s, scientists found the first “memory molecule.” Several other candidates have popped up in the decades since.

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  11. black and white image of a sponge's digestive chambers with a neuroid cell highlighted in blue
    Neuroscience

    Brainless sponges contain early echoes of a nervous system

    Simple sponges contain cells that appear to send signals to digestive chambers, a communication system that offer hints about how brains evolved.

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  12. brain scan
    Neuroscience

    A blood test may help predict recovery from traumatic brain injury

    High levels of a key blood protein point to brain shrinkage and damage to message-sending axons, providing a biomarker for TBI severity and prognosis.

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