Humans

More Stories in Humans

  1. Health & Medicine

    Snake venom toxins can be neutralized by a new synthetic antibody

    A lab-made protein protected mice from lethal doses of paralyzing toxins found in a variety of snakes, a new study reports.

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  2. Health & Medicine

    50 years ago, computers helped speed up drug discovery

    In 1974, a computer program helped researchers search for promising cancer drugs. Today, AI is helping speed up drug discovery.

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  3. Health & Medicine

    The United States was on course to eliminate syphilis. Now it’s surging

    Science News spoke with expert Allison Agwu about what’s driving the surge and how we can better prevent the disease.

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  4. Health & Medicine

    Messed-up metabolism during development may lead guts to coil the wrong way

    Tadpoles exposed to a metabolism-disrupting herbicide had malformed intestines, providing clues to a human condition called intestinal malrotation.

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  5. Health & Medicine

    Taking a weight-loss drug reduced a craving for opioids

    Early results from 20 people with opioid use disorder raise hopes that popular weight-loss drugs like Wegovy can tackle opioid addiction, too.

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  6. Health & Medicine

    Newfound immune cells are responsible for long-lasting allergies

    A specialized type of immune cell appears primed to make the type of antibodies that lead to allergies, two research groups report.

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  7. Archaeology

    These South American cave paintings reveal a surprisingly old tradition

    Radiocarbon dates point to an artistic design practice that began in Patagonia almost 8,200 years ago, several millennia earlier than previously recorded.

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  8. Health & Medicine

    U.S. opioid deaths are out of control. Can safe injection sites help?

    A new NIH study will evalute the only two officially sanctioned sites, in New York City, and a future site in Providence, R.I.

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  9. Anthropology

    50 years ago, evidence showed that an extinct human ancestor walked upright

    Fossil finds have since pushed back the ability of hominids to walk on two legs by millions of years.

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