Humans

More Stories in Humans

  1. Health & Medicine

    These tiny aquatic animals secrete a compound that may help fight snail fever

    A newly identified molecule from rotifers paralyzes the larvae of worms that cause schistosomiasis, which affects over 200 million people worldwide.

    By
  2. Cerebral organoids made of human cells (left) or chimpanzee cells (right)
    Neuroscience

    Organoids offer clues to how brains are made in humans and chimpanzees

    Three-dimensional clumps of brain cells offer clues about how brains get made in humans and chimpanzees.

    By
  3. cancer cells illustration
    Health & Medicine

    A precision drug for prostate cancer may slow the disease’s spread

    The drug olaparib could be used to treat men with certain genetic mutations and severe types of prostate cancer, a clinical trial finds.

    By
  4. vaping products
    Health & Medicine

    Nearly 1,300 injuries and 29 deaths in the U.S. have been tied to vaping

    As the investigation continues, health officials expect multiple causes will be behind the ever-growing number of vaping-related lung injuries.

    By
  5. Bronze Age skeleton
    Archaeology

    Ancient European households combined the rich and poor

    Homes combined “haves” and “have-nots” in a male-run system, suggests a study that challenges traditional views of ancient social stratification.

    By
  6. mosquito fumigation
    Humans

    Nepal is reeling from an unprecedented dengue outbreak

    As climate change opens new regions to mosquitoes, Nepal suffers an outbreak of the painful viral disease that has sickened more than 9,000 people.

    By
  7. William Kaelin, Gregg Semenza and Peter Ratcliffe
    Health & Medicine

    Discovery of how cells sense oxygen wins the 2019 medicine Nobel

    Understanding the molecular switch that lets cells cope with oxygen has implications for everything from metabolism to wound healing.

    By
  8. measles vaccine
    Health & Medicine

    The U.S. narrowly eked out a measles win, keeping elimination status

    The risk of measles, while low in the United States, still remains due to undervaccinated areas and international travelers importing the virus.

    By
  9. line representation of brain waves
    Neuroscience

    Dueling brain waves during sleep may decide whether rats remember or forget

    In a slumbering rat, two distinct kinds of brain waves have opposite jobs.

    By