Humans

  1. mask illustration
    Health & Medicine

    As 2020 comes to an end, here’s what we still don’t know about COVID-19

    After making fast progress understanding COVID-19, researchers are still in search of answers.

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  2. Lava tube in New Mexico
    Archaeology

    Ancient people may have survived desert droughts by melting ice in lava tubes

    Bands of charcoal from fires lit long ago, found in an ice core from a New Mexico cave, correspond to five periods of drought over 800 years.

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  3. Pfizer headquarters in New York City
    Health & Medicine

    Here’s what you need to know about the COVID-19 vaccines

    There are still important unknowns about how Pfizer’s vaccine and others will work once they get injected in people around the world.

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  4. stone with microscopic bone residue
    Archaeology

    Two stones fuel debate over when America’s first settlers arrived

    Stones possibly used to break mastodon bones 130,000 years ago in what is now California get fresh scrutiny.

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  5. dugout canoe crafted using axes modeled off of Japanese artifacts
    Humans

    Ancient humans may have deliberately voyaged to Japan’s Ryukyu Islands

    Satellite-tracked buoys suggest that long ago, a remote Japanese archipelago was reached by explorers on purpose, not accidentally.

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  6. cold case for vaccine storage
    Health & Medicine

    The ‘last mile’ for COVID-19 vaccines could be the biggest challenge yet

    The need for cold storage and booster shots could create problems for distributing coronavirus vaccines to nearly everyone in the world.

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  7. line of shoppers outside Selfridges department store
    Health & Medicine

    The U.K. is the first country to authorize a fully tested COVID-19 vaccine

    Pfizer will deliver the first of 40 million doses of its coronavirus vaccine promised to the United Kingdom in the coming days.

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  8. Health care workers at UMass Memorial Hospital
    Health & Medicine

    Health care workers and long-term care residents should get COVID-19 vaccines first

    With an initial 40 million doses of the vaccines, enough for 20 million people, anticipated by year-end, health officials are setting priorities.

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  9. photo of a parked van with side door open; young woman and toddler sitting inside
    Health & Medicine

    Long-lasting shots work better than daily pills to prevent HIV in at-risk women

    A more discreet HIV prevention method — a shot once every eight weeks —could help to boost use in women at risk.

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  10. woman putting a closed sign in a window
    Health & Medicine

    Coronavirus shutdowns don’t need to be all or nothing

    Governments are implementing more targeted restrictions like limiting restaurant capacity to slow a fall surge. Research suggests they could work.

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  11. People with the genetic disease progeria
    Health & Medicine

    The FDA has approved the first drug to treat the rapid-aging disease progeria

    Children with a rare genetic disorder called progeria age quickly and often die before they are 15. A newly approved drug may give them more time.

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  12. the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 in intestinal cells
    Health & Medicine

    Immunity to COVID-19 may persist six months or more

    Even after recovery, the body continues to improve its antibody response to the coronavirus — perhaps thanks to viral bits hiding in the intestine.

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