Animals

  1. Dingo from Australia
    Animals

    Culling dingoes with poison may be making them bigger

    Meat laced with toxic powder has been used for decades to kill dingoes. Now, dingoes in baited areas are changing: They’re getting bigger.

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  2. illustration of a woolly rhino
    Life

    Climate change, not hunters, may have killed off woolly rhinos

    Ancient DNA indicates that numbers of woolly rhinos held steady long after people arrived on the scene.

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  3. dozens of locusts flying around in the desert
    Life

    A single molecule may entice normally solitary locusts to form massive swarms

    Scientists pinpoint a compound emitted by locusts that could inform new ways of controlling the pests.

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  4. Cat on a bed
    Health & Medicine

    How two coronavirus drugs for cats might help humans fight COVID-19

    Scientists are exploring if drugs for a disease caused by a coronavirus that infects only cats might help also people infected with the coronavirus.

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  5. tuatara
    Animals

    How tuatara live so long and can withstand cool weather

    Tuatara may look like your average lizard, but they’re not. Now, researchers have deciphered the rare reptiles’ genome, or genetic instruction book.

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  6. emperor penguins
    Animals

    Penguin poop spotted from space ups the tally of emperor penguin colonies

    High-res satellite images reveal eight new breeding sites for the world’s largest penguins on Antarctica, including the first reported ones offshore.

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  7. bumblebee
    Life

    Wild bees add about $1.5 billion to yields for just six U.S. crops

    Native bees help pollinate blueberries, cherries and other crops on commercial farms.

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  8. Pond frog
    Life

    Water beetles can live on after being eaten and excreted by a frog

    After being eaten by a frog, some water beetles can scurry through the digestive tract and emerge on the other side, alive and well.

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  9. banana spider in web
    Animals

    Some spiders may spin poisonous webs laced with neurotoxins

    The sticky silk threads of spider webs may be hiding a toxic secret: potent neurotoxins that paralyze a spider’s prey.

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  10. Mussels in a yellow bag
    Ecosystems

    To save Appalachia’s endangered mussels, scientists hatched a bold plan

    Biologists have just begun to learn whether their bold plan worked to save the golden riffleshell, a freshwater mussel teetering on the brink of extinction.

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  11. Male deep-sea anglerfish
    Animals

    An immune system quirk may help anglerfish fuse with mates during sex

    Deep-sea anglerfish that fuse to mate lack genes involved in the body’s response against pathogens or foreign tissue.

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  12. yellow-rumped leaf-eared mouse
    Animals

    A South American mouse is the world’s highest-dwelling mammal

    At 6,739 meters above sea level, the yellow-rumped leaf-eared mouse survives low oxygen and freezing conditions atop a dormant volcano.

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