Archaeology

  1. photo of 3,000-year-old pants taken from above
    Archaeology

    The world’s oldest pants stitched together cultures from across Asia

    A re-creation of a 3,000-year-old horseman’s trousers helped scientists unravel its complex origins.

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  2. an ancient bishop's headgear which was stiffened by manuscripts
    Archaeology

    A technique borrowed from ecology hints at hundreds of lost medieval legends

    An ecology-based statistical approach may provide a storybook ending for efforts to gauge ancient cultural diversity.

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  3. image of a stone point with a sharp edge
    Archaeology

    Homo sapiens may have reached Europe 10,000 years earlier than previously thought

    Archaeological finds in an ancient French rock-shelter suggest migrations to the continent started long before Neandertals died out.

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  4. Clovis spearpoints
    Archaeology

    ‘Origin’ explores the controversial science of the first Americans

    A new book looks at how genetics has affected the study of humans’ arrival in the Americas and sparked conflicts with Indigenous groups today.

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  5. image of an ancient tooth covered in plaque
    Archaeology

    A taste for wild cereal sowed farming’s spread in ancient Europe

    Balkan groups collected and ate wild cereal grains several millennia before domesticated cereals reached Europe.

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  6. an illustration of ancient people gathered around a pot drinking from long straws
    Archaeology

    Gold and silver tubes in a Russian museum are the oldest known drinking straws

    Long metal tubes enabled communal beer drinking more than 5,000 years ago, scientists say.

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  7. fossilized skeletons of four kungas lying side by side
    Animals

    Part donkey, part wild ass, the kunga is the oldest known hybrid bred by humans

    Syria’s 4,500-year-old kungas were donkey-wild ass hybrids, genetic analysis reveals, so the earliest known example of humans crossing animal species.

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  8. illustration of a clovis hunter aiming a spear at a mammoth
    Archaeology

    Clovis hunters’ reputation as mammoth killers takes a hit

    Early Americans’ stone points were best suited to butchering the huge beasts’ carcasses, scientists contend.

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  9. a bronze buckle shown from the front and back
    Archaeology

    Arctic hunter-gatherers were advanced ironworkers more than 2,000 years ago

    Swedish excavations uncover furnaces and fire pits from a big metal operation run by a small-scale society, a new study finds.

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  10. image of archaeologists excavating at a site in Germany
    Archaeology

    Neandertals were the first hominids to turn forest into grassland 125,000 years ago

    Neandertals’ campfires, hunting and other activities altered the land over 2,000 years, making them the first known hominids to impact their environs.

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  11. a photo showing a fossilized aprtial jaw and braincase
    Anthropology

    2021 research reinforced that mating across groups drove human evolution

    Fossils and DNA point to mixing and mingling among Homo groups across vast areas.

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  12. image of pyramids in Egypt
    Anthropology

    ‘The Dawn of Everything’ rewrites 40,000 years of human history

    A new book recasts human social evolution as multiple experiments with freedom and domination that started in the Stone Age.

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