Anthropology

  1. Homo erectus braincase
    Humans

    Southern Africa may have hosted a hominid transition 2 million years ago

    Braincases excavated from the Drimolen caves suggest Homo erectus and Paranthropus robustus may have coexisted in southern Africa.

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  2. Lucy reconstruction
    Anthropology

    Lucy’s species heralded the rise of long childhoods in hominids

    Australopithecus afarensis had prolonged brain growth before the Homo genus appeared, but it still resulted in brains with chimplike neural structure.

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  3. Broken Hill skull
    Anthropology

    This 300,000-year-old skull may be from an African ‘ghost’ population

    The age of the mysterious Broken Hill fossil suggests it came from a hominid that lived around the same time as both Homo sapiens and H. naledi.

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  4. Figueira Brava
    Archaeology

    Neandertals’ extensive seafood menu rivals that of ancient humans

    Finds from a coastal cave in Portugal reveal repeated ocean foraging for this European hominid.

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  5. ostrich eggshell beads
    Anthropology

    An ancient social safety net in Africa was built on beads

    A Stone Age network of communities across southern Africans was established using ostrich shell beads by around 33,000 years ago.

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  6. Anthropology

    New fossils and artifacts show Homo erectus crafted a diverse toolkit

    Ancient hominid made stone tools demanding a range of skills and planning, a study finds.

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  7. Paranthropus boisei
    Anthropology

    The ancient hominid species that includes ‘Nutcracker Man’ may have made tools

    Newly described hand, arm and shoulder fossils suggest that Paranthropus boisei had powerful arms with hands capable of making simple tools.

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  8. Humans

    Evolving an arch across the foot’s width helped hominids walk upright

    The arch across the foot evolved at least 3.4 million years ago, possibly before the lengthwise arch. Both arches help humans to walk and run.

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  9. skull of Chan Hol 3 skeleton
    Archaeology

    An ancient skeleton from an underwater Mexican cave sheds light on early Americans

    A nearly 10,000-year-old skeleton discovered in a submerged Mexican cave provides more clues to how and when people settled the Americas.

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  10. Baka people
    Genetics

    Ancient kids’ DNA reveals new insights into how Africa was populated

    Four long-dead youngsters from west-central Africa have opened a window on humankind’s far-flung African origins.

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  11. clamshells
    Anthropology

    Neandertals dove and harvested clamshells for tools near Italy’s shores

    The discovery of sharpened shells broadens the reputation of Stone Age human relatives: Neandertals weren’t just one-trick mammoth hunters.

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  12. Homo erectus skull
    Humans

    Homo erectus arrived in Indonesia 300,000 years later than previously thought

    The extinct, humanlike hominid likely reached the island of Java by around 1.3 million years ago, a study finds.

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