Life

  1. Acropora corals in New Caledonia
    Life

    Neon colors may help some corals stage a comeback from bleaching

    When some corals bleach, they turn bright colors. Stunning hues may be part of a response that helps the corals recover and reunite with their algae.

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  2. four brightly colored, fuzzy-looking critters
    Animals

    New species of scaly, deep-sea worms named after Elvis have been found

    A genetic analysis sheds new light on funky scale worms with glittery, scales reminiscent of sequins on the “The King’s” iconic jumpsuits.

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  3. Neuroscience

    How coronavirus stress may scramble our brains

    The pandemic has made clear thinking a real struggle. But researchers say knowing how stress affects the brain can help people cope.

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  4. bumblebee
    Life

    Pollen-deprived bumblebees may speed up plant blooming by biting leaves

    In a pollen shortage, some bees nick holes in tomato leaves that accelerate flowering, and pollen production, by weeks.

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  5. Siberia’s Selenga River
    Genetics

    The oldest genetic link between Asians and Native Americans was found in Siberia

    DNA from a fragment of a 14,000-year-old tooth suggests that Native Americans have widespread Asian ancestry.

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  6. a marine parchment tube worm glows blue against a black background
    Chemistry

    Here’s a clue to how this tube worm’s slime can glow blue for days

    Mucus oozed by a marine tube worm can glow for up to 72 hours. New results suggest that the light may sustain itself through some clever chemistry.

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  7. anchovy ancestor
    Paleontology

    Saber-toothed anchovy relatives hunted in the sea 50 million years ago

    Unlike today’s plankton-eating anchovies with tiny teeth, ancient anchovy kin had lower jaw of sharp spikes paired with a single giant sabertooth.

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  8. man standing at a screen drawing a letter with his fingers
    Neuroscience

    Blind people can ‘see’ letters traced directly onto their brains

    Arrays of electrodes can trace shapes onto people’s brains, creating bursts of light that people can “see.”

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  9. false-color microscope image of embryonic mouse eye
    Genetics

    New hybrid embryos are the most thorough mixing of humans and mice yet

    Human-mice chimeras may usher in a deeper understanding of how cells build bodies.

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  10. Peruvian man walking up cobblestone path
    Humans

    A gene variant partly explains why Peruvians are among the world’s shortest people

    A gene variant reduces some Peruvians’ height by about 2 centimeters, on average, the biggest effect on stature found for a common variation in DNA.

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  11. Ecosystems

    Tapirs may be key to reviving the Amazon. All they need to do is poop

    Brazilian ecologist Lucas Paolucci is collecting tapir dung to understand how the piglike mammals may help restore degraded rain forests.

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  12. Mnemiopsis ledyi
    Animals

    Some comb jellies cannibalize their young when food is scarce

    Invasive warty comb jellies feast on their larvae after massive population booms in the summer deplete their prey from waters off of Germany.

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