Life

  1. one-celled algae with flagella
    Life

    Algae use flagella to trot, gallop and move with gaits all their own

    Single-celled microalgae, with no brains, can coordinate their “limbs” into a trot or fancier gait.

    By
  2. beets and blue dye made from beets
    Chemistry

    Beets bleed red but a chemistry tweak can create a blue hue

    A new blue dye derived from beet juice might prove an alternative to synthetic blue dyes in foods, cosmetics or fabrics.

    By
  3. Mouse expression illustration
    Neuroscience

    Mice’s facial expressions can reveal a wide range of emotions

    Pleasure, pain, fear and other feelings can be reflected in mice’s faces, sophisticated computational analyses show.

    By
  4. a cat
    Animals

    A cat appears to have caught the coronavirus, but it’s complicated

    While a cat in Belgium seems to be the first feline infected with SARS-CoV-2, it’s still unclear how susceptible pets are to the disease.

    By
  5. Anisakis parasites on a salmon fillet
    Animals

    Parasitic worm populations are skyrocketing in some fish species used in sushi

    Fishes worldwide harbor 283 times the number of Anisakis worms as fishes in the 1970s. Whether that’s a sign of environmental decline or recovery is unclear.

    By
  6. Health & Medicine

    There’s no evidence the coronavirus jumped from pangolins to people

    Pangolins captured in anti-smuggling activities in southern China were found to harbor viruses related to the new coronavirus.

    By
  7. Dineobellator notohesperus illustration
    Paleontology

    Fossils of a new dromaeosaur date to the end of the Age of Dinosaurs

    Fossils from a new dromaeosaur recovered from New Mexico suggest these fierce predators were diversifying up to the end of the Age of Dinosaurs.

    By
  8. SARS-CoV-2 virus
    Genetics

    No, the coronavirus wasn’t made in a lab. A genetic analysis shows it’s from nature

    Scientists took conspiracy theories seriously and analyzed the coronavirus to reveal its natural origins.

    By
  9. longfin inshore squid
    Genetics

    Squid edit their genetic material in a uniquely weird place

    Some squids’ seeming ability to edit RNA on the fly could help scientists develop a technique much like the DNA-editing tool CRISPR, but for RNA.

    By
  10. Tiktaalik roseae illustration
    Life

    A new book captures how genetics fills in the story of life’s evolution

    In Some Assembly Required, paleontologist Neil Shubin explores how genetic analyses complement paleontological research.

    By
  11. Asteriornis maastrichtensis 3-D–printed skull
    Paleontology

    ‘Wonderchicken’ is the earliest known modern bird at nearly 67 million years old

    A new fossil find, dubbed the Wonderchicken, is a common ancestor of modern ducks and chickens.

    By
  12. Toro Negro State Forest
    Climate

    How Hurricane Maria’s heavy rains devastated Puerto Rico’s forests

    Hurricane Maria wreaked havoc on Puerto Rican forests in some unexpected ways.

    By