Chemistry

  1. image of wildfire haze over the Golden Gate bridge and the San Francisco skyline
    Climate

    Wildfire smoke may ramp up toxic ozone production in cities

    A new study reveals how wildfire smoke produces toxic ozone and how urban air pollution could exacerbate the problem.

    By
  2. image of a cannabis flower
    Chemistry

    Here’s the chemistry behind marijuana’s skunky scent

    Newly ID’d sulfur compounds in cannabis flowers give the plant its telltale odor. One, prenylthiol, is what also gives “skunked beer” its funky flavor.

    By
  3. glitter
    Chemistry

    This eco-friendly glitter gets its color from plants, not plastic

    Using cellulose extracted from wood pulp, researchers have created a greener alternative to traditional glitter.

    By
  4. A white Nissan electric car with a charger stuck into the front
    Materials Science

    Lithium-ion batteries made with recycled materials can outlast newer counterparts

    Batteries with recycled cathodes outperformed batteries with new cathodes, lasting for thousands more charging cycles before their capacity waned.

    By
  5. illustration of the molecular structures of two mirror versions of limonene
    Chemistry

    An easier, greener way to build molecules wins the chemistry Nobel Prize

    Chemists Benjamin List and David MacMillan have sparked a whole new field that’s aided drug discovery and made chemistry more environmentally friendly.

    By
  6. the bones of the famous skeleton Lucy arranged on a black background
    Chemistry

    Radiometric dating puts pieces of the past in context. Here’s how

    Carbon dating and other techniques answer essential questions about human history, our planet and the solar system.

    By
  7. image of a letter written by Marie Antoinette with a blacked out section next to an image of the same letter where the blacked out section is visible
    Chemistry

    Ink analysis reveals Marie Antoinette’s letters’ hidden words and who censored them

    Chemical analyses of letters written by Marie Antoinette solve a French Revolution mystery: Who censored the queen?

    By
  8. black and white image of Luis Miramontes in a lab coat
    Chemistry

    Luis Miramontes helped enable the sexual revolution. Why isn’t he better known?

    By synthesizing norethindrone, one of the first active ingredients in birth control pills, Luis Miramontes helped usher in the sexual revolution.

    By
  9. sewage runoff pours out of a drainpipe
    Environment

    50 years ago, chemical pollutants were linked to odd animal behavior

    Fifty years after studies hinted that pollution interferes with how aquatic creatures communicate, scientists are still unraveling its myriad effects.

    By
  10. tempered chocolate being spread over a pastry
    Chemistry

    A pinch of saturated fat could make tempering chocolate a breeze

    Adding a small amount of fatty molecules to cocoa butter could simplify the labor-intensive tempering process to create melt-in-your-mouth chocolate.

    By
  11. a gloved hand holds plastic pack rings (to hold six canned beverages together), behind the rings is a beach
    Chemistry

    50 years ago, scientists developed self-destructing plastic

    In the 1970s, scientists developed plastic that could quickly break down when exposed to light. But that didn’t solve the world’s pollution problems.

    By
  12. several makeup items - lipstick, a compact, blush brush, mascara - sit on a cream-colored background
    Chemistry

    Many cosmetics contain hidden, potentially dangerous ‘forever chemicals’

    Scientists found signs of long-lasting PFAS compounds in about half of tested makeup products, especially waterproof mascaras and lipsticks.

    By