Sid Perkins | Science News

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Guest Writer

Sid Perkins

Sid Perkins is a freelance science writer based in Crossville, Tenn.

Sid Perkins' Articles

  • News

    Sahara to get hotter, drier, smaller

    By the end of this century, the world's hottest desert will be even hotter, drier, and smaller than it is now, according to an international team of climate modelers.
  • News

    Resetting a clock from Earth's rocks

    Better measurements of one of the rates of radioactive decay used to date extremely old rocks open up the possibility that Earth may have had a crust as many as 200 million years earlier than previously thought.
  • News

    Deep-sea gear takes wild ride on lava

    When a set of instruments monitoring an underwater volcano got trapped in an eruption in early 1998, the scientists who had deployed the sensors ended up with more data than they bargained for.
  • Feature

    A Ticklish Debate

    Paleontologists engaged in a contentious debate about the origins of feathers often reach interpretations that are poles apart, and they defend their views with fervor.
  • News

    Marine plankton put nitrogen in a fix

    New genetic analyses of tropical marine microorganisms hint that some species are converting significant amounts of atmospheric nitrogen into nutrients, helping to fortify the base of the ocean's food pyramid.
  • News

    Study picks new site for dinosaur nostrils

    A new analysis of fossils and living animals suggests that most dinosaurs' nostrils occurred at locations toward the tip of their snout rather than farther up on their face, a concept that may change scientists' views of the animals' physiology and behavior.
  • News

    Atlantic coast may be in for a pounding

    The above-average number and strength of hurricanes in the North Atlantic during the past 6 years may signal the beginning of a threatening weather trend for the United States, the Caribbean, and Central America.
  • News

    New type of hydrothermal vent looms large

    The discovery of a new type of hydrothermal vent system on an undersea mountain in the Atlantic Ocean suggests that submarine hydrothermal activity may be much more widespread than previously thought.
  • Feature

    The Silence of the Bams

    If a nuclear explosion were set off in a cavity of the right size and shape, even a moderate-sized nuclear bomb might appear at long distances to be no bigger than a routine explosion used in mining.