Scicurious

A peek behind the science curtain

  1. happy runner
    Neuroscience

    How a fat hormone might make us born to run

    Many runners finish long races in a euphoric mood. The underpinnings of this runner’s high may involve many chemicals, including the fat hormone leptin.

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  2. Addyi (flibanserin)
    Health & Medicine

    With flibanserin approval, a complicated drug takes the spotlight

    The Food and Drug Administration has approved the first drug to increase women’s sexual desire. But whether the benefits outweigh the side effects depends on who you ask.

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  3. muffins
    Neuroscience

    The need to feed and eating for pleasure are inextricably linked

    Scientists used to think that the hunger and the pleasure from food could be easily distinguished. But new results show these systems are inextricably intertwined.

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  4. woman bundled up in scarf adjusting thermostat
    Health & Medicine

    Building standards aren’t to blame for chilly offices

    A recent study made headlines for finding differences between men and women in comfort level for heating and cooling. But that’s not why women are cold in the office.

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  5. doughnut
    Health & Medicine

    How trans fats oozed into our diet and out again

    Trans fats are no longer “generally recognized as safe” by the FDA. In a world where we want to have our doughnuts and eat them, too, it’s back to the drawing board, and back to butter.

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  6. woman asleep in an airport
    Health & Medicine

    The weekly grind of social jetlag could be a weighty issue

    Even those of us with nine-to-five jobs don’t always respect our body’s clocks. Research shows that even slight disruptions might be associated with obesity.

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  7. firemen's coats
    Life

    Shifted waking hours may pave the way to shifting metabolism

    Shift workers are at higher risk for obesity and metabolic problems. Scientists are working hard to understand why the night shift makes our hormones go awry.

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  8. close-up of woman's face
    Life

    Women blush when ovulating, and it doesn’t matter a bit

    Women don’t signal their fertility in obvious ways like nonhuman primates. A new study shows that even skin flushes are too subtle to detect.

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  9. people wearing surgical masks on subway in Seoul, South Korea
    Science & Society

    No matter the language, disease risk is hard to communicate

    Reassuring messages about MERS might seem designed to stop panic. But in reality, people need to hear the truth, even if it’s uncertain.

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  10. “Grumpy Cat” pic
    Psychology

    The guilty pleasure of funny cat videos

    Many people love posting and looking at cute kitty content online. A new survey shows that this could be because it helps us manage our emotions.

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  11. heroin in spoon with needle
    Science & Society

    Home-brewed heroin: Hold the hype

    Now is the time to think about policy for synthetically produced morphine, but the process, if it bears out, is years away from working.

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  12. display of lollipops
    Neuroscience

    Diet and nutrition is more complex than a simple sugar

    A new study shows that fructose may leave you wanting more when compared to the same dose of glucose. But in studies of single nutrients, it’s important to be cautious.

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