Archaeology

  1. Archaeology

    Stone Age statuettes don disputed apparel

    A report describing woven caps, skirts, belts, and other apparel on Venus figurines from the Stone Age draws some critical responses.

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  2. Archaeology

    How agriculture ground to a start

    A major advance in agriculture occurred around 11,000 years ago, when western Asians began to walk through patches of wild barley and wheat and scoop handfuls of ripened grains off the ground, a report suggests.

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  3. Archaeology

    Lion skeleton found in Egyptian tomb

    Archaeologists found the skeleton of a once-mummified lion at an Egyptian site dating to more than 2,000 years ago, confirming suspicions that lions were revered as sacred animals.

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  4. Archaeology

    Bones of Invention: German cave yields Stone Age figurines

    Three ivory figurines found in southwestern Germany may belong to one of the world's oldest known art traditions, dating to more than 30,000 years ago.

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  5. Archaeology

    Bones of Invention: German cave yields Stone Age figurines

    Three ivory figurines found in southwestern Germany may belong to one of the world's oldest known art traditions, dating to more than 30,000 years ago.

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  6. Archaeology

    Ancient tunnel keeps biblical date

    Radiocarbon dating of material from an ancient tunnel in Jerusalem indicates that the passage was built around 700 B.C., supporting a biblical account of the tunnel's construction.

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  7. Archaeology

    Origins of Smelting: Lake yields core of pre-Inca silver making

    Metal concentrations in soil extracted from a Bolivian lake indicate that silver production in the region began 1,000 years ago, 4 centuries before well-known silver-making efforts by the Incas.

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  8. Archaeology

    Art on the Rocks: Dating ancient paintings in the caves of Borneo

    By dating the mineral deposits on top of cave paintings in Borneo, archaeologists have pushed back the date of earliest human habitation on the island by at least 5,000 years.

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  9. Archaeology

    Maya palace suddenly expands

    Archaeologists find a sprawling palace and other surprises at a 1,300-year-old Maya site in Guatemala.

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  10. Archaeology

    Ancient Site Holds Cannibalism Clues

    An 800-year-old Anasazi site in Colorado yields contested evidence of cannibalism.

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  11. Archaeology

    Blasts from the Past

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  12. Archaeology

    Grave surprise rises in Jamestown fort

    Excavations in the 17th-century fort at Jamestown, Va., have yielded a grave containing the skeleton of a high-ranking male colonist.

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