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Mystery Solved

Shark jelly is strong proton conductor

Researchers closer to explaining how ampullae of Lorenzini detect electric fields

By
2:30pm, June 27, 2016
Shark snout

IT’S ELECTRIC  A shark’s snout contains tiny pores, known as ampullae of Lorenzini, which can sense weak electric fields from prey. New research indicates that a jelly inside the pores is a highly efficient proton conductor.

Sharks have a sixth sense that helps them locate prey in murky ocean waters. They rely on special pores on their heads and snouts, called ampullae of Lorenzini, that can sense electric fields generated when nearby prey move. The pores were first described in 1678, but scientists haven’t been sure how they work. Now, the answer is a bit closer.

The pores, which connect to electrosensing cells, are filled with a mysterious clear jelly. This jelly is a highly efficient proton conductor, researchers report May 13 in Science Advances. In the jelly, positively charged particles move and transmit current.

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