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Guest Writer

Tom Siegfried

Blog writer, Context

Tom Siegfried, former editor in chief of Science News, writes the Context blog at www.sciencenews.org. In addition to Science News, his work has appeared in Science, Nature, Astronomy, New Scientist and Smithsonian. Previously he was the science editor of The Dallas Morning News. He is the author of three books: The Bit and the Pendulum, (Wiley, 2000); Strange Matters (National Academy of Sciences’ Joseph Henry Press, 2002); and A Beautiful Math (2006, Joseph Henry Press).

Tom was born in Lakewood, Ohio, and grew up in nearby Avon. He earned an undergraduate degree from Texas Christian University with majors in journalism, chemistry and history, and has a master of arts with a major in journalism and a minor in physics from the University of Texas at Austin.

His awards include the American Geophysical Union's Robert C. Cowen Award for Sustained Achievement in Science Journalism, the Science-in Society award from the National Association of Science Writers, the American Association for the Advancement of Science-Westinghouse Award, and the American Chemical Society’s James T. Grady-James H. Stack Award for Interpreting Chemistry for the Public. He is currently on the board of directors and serves as treasurer for the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing.

Tom Siegfried's Articles

  • 
    Context

    It’s too soon to declare supersymmetry a tragedy

    Supersymmetry is the odds-on favorite to solve many of the mysteries about the physical world that have stumped theorists for decades. Supposedly the LHC should produce actual evidence for SUSY, but it hasn’t. And so some physicists have begun to declare SUSY dead, or at least on life-support.

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  • 
    Context

    Higgs owes his Nobel to an editor and a biologist

    From my archive, on Peter Higgs and his boson.

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  • 
    Context

    Top 10 physicists with no Nobel

    While a lot of people are busy predicting who will win Nobel Prizes this week, it would be easier to predict who won’t get the physics prize because they’re dead and therefore no longer eligible. Plus there are those who deserve it and are still alive but probably won’t get it because the Nobel guys don’t seem to like theorists very much.

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  • 
    Context

    Top 10 “Negative” Inventions

    Throughout the history of math and science, supposedly impossible negative things have repeatedly turned out to be important both mathematically an

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  • 
    Context

    Weighing the implications of negative-mass antimatter

    Antimatter is anti- a lot of things, but it’s not supposed to be antigravity.

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  • 
    Context

    Fact and fiction about negative mass

    Sometimes science makes progress by adopting a negative attitude.

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  • Randomness

    Born half a century ago, chaos theory languished for years

    Predicting the impact of a scientific discovery is a lot like predicting the weather. You never know what obscure paper in the scientific literature (or small disturbance in the atmosphere) will eventually produce a deluge of new research (or rain).