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Your search has returned 1554 articles:
  • Science Stats

    1 million species are under threat. Here are 5 ways we speed up extinctions

    Stories about individual species on the brink of extinction may be all too familiar. But a new tally now reveals the breadth of the conservation crisis: One million of the world’s species are now poised to vanish, some as soon as within the next few decades.

    That number, which amounts to 1 in every 8 animal or plant species on Earth, comes from a sweeping new analysis of about 15,000...

    05/08/2019 - 06:00 Conservation, Climate, Pollution, Science & Society
  • News

    Medical student evaluations appear riddled with racial and gender biases

    Men are “scientific,” women are “lovely” and underrepresented minorites are “pleasant” and “nice.” If those sound like stereotypes, they are. But they’re also words commonly used to evaluate medical students, a study finds.

    Analysis of nearly 88,000 evaluations of third-year medical students written from 2006 to 2015 revealed evidence of implicit bias. White women and underrepresented...

    05/06/2019 - 07:00 Science & Society
  • News

    Facebook data show how many people left Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria

    Hurricane Maria sent Puerto Ricans fleeing from the island to the U.S. mainland, but population surveys to assess the size of that migration would have taken at least a year to complete. A new study suggests, however, that a Facebook tool for advertisers could provide crude, real-time estimates for how many people are moving because of a natural disaster. That could help governments design...

    05/03/2019 - 07:00 Science & Society, Technology, Computing
  • Experiences

    A science-themed escape room gives the brain a workout

    Professor Schrödenberg is missing, and evil agents want to use her quantum computing research for nefarious purposes. Stopping them is up to you, but completing your mission will require solving some mind-bending puzzles —based on science.

    If you are up for the challenge, you can test your wits at LabEscape, a science-themed escape room at the Lincoln Square Mall in Urbana, Ill. Escape...

    04/29/2019 - 12:40 Science & Society, Physics, Quantum Physics
  • Transparency Project

    How we reported on the challenges of using ancestry tests to solve crimes

    This is part of the Transparency Project, which explains how we do science journalism. This article refers to a story published in April 2018, “New genetic sleuthing tools helped track down the Golden State Killer suspect.”

    I was in the midst of writing a series on consumer DNA testing when news broke that police had arrested a suspect in the Golden State Killer case. Investigators had...

    04/26/2019 - 12:24 Science & Society
  • Transparency Project

    How we reported a controversial story about the day the dinosaurs died

    This is part of the Transparency Project, which explains how we do science journalism. This article refers to a story published in April 2019, “New fossils may capture the minutes after the dinosaur-killing asteroid impact.”

    How did you find this story?

    This was an unusual story for us because it was based not only on a research paper published in a scientific journal, which is the type...

    04/26/2019 - 12:24 Science & Society
  • Transparency Project

    Introducing the Transparency Project

    Here at Science News we work hard to make sure that our coverage of the latest advances in science, medicine and technology is clear, accurate and comprehensive. But we realize that what’s clear to us about how we do science journalism may not be clear to our readers. And we want to be open and accountable about that process.

    So we’re launching the Transparency Project. In the coming...

    04/26/2019 - 12:23 Science & Society
  • Reviews & Previews

    A mathematician traces his journey from poverty to prominence

    The Shape of a LifeShing-Tung Yau and Steve NadisYale Univ., $28

    One of the first remarkable things that mathematician Shing-Tung Yau reveals in his memoir, The Shape of a Life, is that his name was not originally Yau. His family fled China to British-ruled Hong Kong in 1949 when he was an infant, and the name Yau came from a mistranslation on a registration form when he entered...

    04/26/2019 - 09:00 Numbers, Science & Society
  • News

    Medicaid expansion may help shrink health gaps between black and white babies

    Black babies in the United States are twice as likely as white infants to be born at low birth weight, and 1.5 times as likely to be born prematurely. But states that expanded Medicaid health care coverage as part of the 2010 Affordable Care Act may be shrinking that racial health gap, a study finds.

    Researchers analyzed birth certificate data in 18 states plus Washington, D.C., that had...

    04/23/2019 - 11:05 Human Development, Science & Society
  • Reviews & Previews

    ‘Invisible Women’ spotlights a gaping and dangerous gender data gap

    Invisible WomenCaroline Criado PerezAbrams Press, $27

    The recent cancellation of the first all-female spacewalk occurred after the publication of Caroline Criado Perez’s Invisible Women. But the news — the lack of enough space suits for the women, suits which weren’t designed for the shape of women’s bodies in the first place — would fit right in to Criado Perez’s scathing takedown...

    04/19/2019 - 10:31 Science & Society, Health