News

  1. a thirteen-lined ground squirrel curled up into a tight ball
    Animals

    Gut microbes help some squirrels stay strong during hibernation

    Microbes living in the critters’ guts take nitrogen from urea and put it into the amino acid glutamine, helping squirrels retain muscle in the winter.

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  2. an anole clinging to a wire fence
    Animals

    Urban animals may get some dangerous gut microbes from humans

    Fecal samples from urban wildlife suggest human gut microbes might be spilling over to the animals. The microbes could jeopardize the animals’ health.

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  3. image of a cheese grater with a smiley face
    Neuroscience

    Americans tend to assume imaginary faces are male

    When people see imaginary faces in everyday objects, those faces are more likely to be perceived as male, a new study shows.

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  4. image of researchers crouched on the ice with snowmobiles
    Planetary Science

    Machine learning points to prime places in Antarctica to find meteorites

    Using data on how ice moves across Antarctica, researchers identified more than 600 spots where space rocks may gather on the southern continent.

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  5. an Arctic hare standing in a snowy landscape
    Animals

    An Arctic hare traveled at least 388 kilometers in a record-breaking journey

    An Arctic hare’s dash across northern Canada, the longest seen among hares and their relatives, is changing how scientists think about tundra ecology.

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  6. photo of a man in a crowd wearing a mask on the back of his head
    Artificial Intelligence

    How AI can identify people even in anonymized datasets

    A neural network identified a majority of anonymous mobile phone service subscribers using details about their weekly social interactions.

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  7. Illustration of the James Webb Space Telescope fully deployed
    Astronomy

    The James Webb Space Telescope has reached its new home at last

    The most powerful telescope ever launched still has a long to-do list before it can start doing science.

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  8. a culture dish showing Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteria
    Health & Medicine

    Antimicrobial resistance is a leading cause of death globally

    In more than 70 percent of the 1.27 million deaths caused by antimicrobial resistance, infections didn’t respond to two classes of first-line antibiotics.

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  9. image of an everlasting bubble
    Physics

    An ‘everlasting’ bubble endured more than a year without popping

    One of the bubbles, made with water, glycerol and microparticles, lasted 465 days before popping.

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  10. Satellite image of the Hunga-Tonga-Hunga-Ha'apai volcano eruption
    Earth

    What the Tonga volcano’s past tells us about what to expect next

    The January 15 eruption of a Tongan volcano triggered atmospheric shock waves and a rare volcanic tsunami; its history suggests it may not be done.

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  11. illustration of a Cow-like supernova with yellow hues
    Astronomy

    An X-ray glow suggests black holes or neutron stars fuel weird cosmic ‘cows’

    With the brightest X-ray glow of a new class of exploding stars, cosmic oddity AT2020mrf boosts evidence of these mysterious blasts’ power source.

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  12. a kayaker paddles down a street as it rains in Old Town Alexandria, Virginia
    Climate

    Intense drought or flash floods can shock the global economy

    Rainfall extremes have powerful impacts on the global economy, affecting the manufacturing and services sectors more than agriculture.

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