News

  1. Space

    The first U.S. lunar lander since 1972 touches down on the moon

    Odysseus, the first spacecraft to land on the moon since NASA’s Apollo 17, ended up tipped on its side but it appears to be operating OK.

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  2. Health & Medicine

    The United States was on course to eliminate syphilis. Now it’s surging

    Science News spoke with expert Allison Agwu about what’s driving the surge and how we can better prevent the disease.

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  3. Physics

    Physicist Sekazi Mtingwa considers himself an apostle of science

    After big contributions in accelerator physics, Sekazi Mtingwa has been focused on opening science for everyone.

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  4. Health & Medicine

    Messed-up metabolism during development may lead guts to coil the wrong way

    Tadpoles exposed to a metabolism-disrupting herbicide had malformed intestines, providing clues to a human condition called intestinal malrotation.

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  5. Science & Society

    Social media harms teens’ mental health, mounting evidence shows. What now?

    Recent studies suggest a causal link between teen social media use and reduced well-being. Now, some researchers are looking into possible mechanisms.

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  6. Health & Medicine

    Taking a weight-loss drug reduced a craving for opioids

    Early results from 20 people with opioid use disorder raise hopes that popular weight-loss drugs like Wegovy can tackle opioid addiction, too.

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  7. Physics

    Here’s how scientists reached nuclear fusion ‘ignition’ for the first time

    The first fusion experiment to produce an energy excess required meticulous planning and also revealed a long-predicted heating phenomenon.

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  8. Neuroscience

    Ancient viruses helped speedy nerves evolve

    A retrovirus embedded in the DNA of some vertebrates helps turn on production of a protein needed to insulate nerve cells, aiding speedy thoughts.

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  9. Planetary Science

    NASA’s OSIRIS-REx nabbed over 120 grams of space rocks from asteroid Bennu

    After being stymied by two stuck screws, NASA finally accessed a trove of Bennu asteroid bits. Mission scientist Harold Connolly tells what’s next.

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  10. Agriculture

    Mixing up root microbes can boost tea’s flavor

    Inoculating tea plant roots with nitrogen-metabolizing bacteria enhances synthesis of theanine, an amino acid that gives tea its savoriness.

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  11. Health & Medicine

    Newfound immune cells are responsible for long-lasting allergies

    A specialized type of immune cell appears primed to make the type of antibodies that lead to allergies, two research groups report.

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  12. Archaeology

    These South American cave paintings reveal a surprisingly old tradition

    Radiocarbon dates point to an artistic design practice that began in Patagonia almost 8,200 years ago, several millennia earlier than previously recorded.

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