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  • Say What?

    These tiny, crackly bubbles are a new type of volcanic ash

    Bread-crust bubble\Bred krəst ˈbəb(ə)l\ n.

    Tiny, gas-filled beads of volcanic ash with a scaly surface.

    Scientists have identified a new type of volcanic ash that erupted from a volcano in central Oregon roughly 7 million years ago. The particles are similar to larger bread-crust bombs, which form as gases trapped inside globs of lava expand, cracking the bombs’ tough exterior. Bread-...

    11/09/2018 - 12:00 Earth
  • News

    Ancient DNA suggests people settled South America in at least 3 waves

    DNA from a 9,000-year-old baby tooth from Alaska, the oldest natural mummy in North America and remains of ancient Brazilians is helping researchers trace the steps of ancient people as they settled the Americas. Two new studies give a more detailed and complicated picture of the peopling of the Americas than ever before presented.

    People from North America moved into South America in at...

    11/09/2018 - 09:00 Genetics, Ancestry
  • November 10, 2018

    11/09/2018 - 08:48
  • News

    Hints of Oort clouds around other stars may lurk in the universe’s first light

    A thick sphere of icy debris known as the Oort cloud shrouds the solar system. Other star systems may harbor similar icy reservoirs, and those clouds may be visible in the universe’s oldest light, researchers report.

    Astronomer Eric Baxter of the University of Pennsylvania and colleagues looked for evidence of such exo-Oort clouds in maps of the cosmic microwave background, the cool...

    11/09/2018 - 06:00 Planetary Science, Exoplanets, Cosmology
  • News

    These fragile, futuristic batteries run longer with a little oil

    Batteries that use aluminum and oxygen normally live fast and die young. But a new design could help these high-energy devices endure.

    Aluminum-air batteries are promising candidates for a new generation of non-rechargeable batteries, because they’re super lightweight and compact. The batteries, however, aren’t widely used because their internal components quickly degrade each other. In...

    11/08/2018 - 14:00 Chemistry, Technology
  • News

    How a life-threatening allergic reaction can happen so fast

    Within minutes of biting into peanut-tainted food, people with a peanut allergy may find their pulse quickening, blood pressure plummeting and throat closing up. They’re experiencing a rapid and sometimes fatal allergic reaction called anaphylaxis.

    New research in mice explains how even a small amount of an allergen can quickly trigger such a strong, full-body reaction. The culprit is a...

    11/08/2018 - 14:00 Immune Science, Health
  • News in Brief

    The number of calories you burn while resting depends on the time of day

    Timing is everything. Even how many calories a person burns while at rest depends on the hour.

    People burn about 129 more calories when resting in the afternoon and evening than in the early morning. But morning is better for burning carbohydrates, while fats are more likely to be burned in the evening, researchers report November 8 in Current Biology. The findings add to evidence that...

    11/08/2018 - 11:00 Physiology
  • News in Brief

    A new drug may boost dwindling treatment options for gonorrhea

    Gonorrhea is a wily foe. But doctors may soon have another drug to fight the sexually transmitted infection that’s become resistant to nearly every antibiotic thrown its way. In clinical trials, a new antibiotic was effective at stopping the bacteria that causes the disease.

    A single oral dose of the drug, called zoliflodacin, cured 96 percent of people who had gonorrhea infections in...

    11/07/2018 - 17:00 Health, Clinical Trials
  • News in Brief

    Marijuana may change the decision-making part of teen brains

    SAN DIEGO — Marijuana use during teenage years may change the brain in key decision-making areas, a study in rats suggests.

    “Adolescence is a dangerous time to be insulting the brain, particularly with drugs of abuse,” study coauthor Eliza Jacobs-Brichford said November 7 at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience.

    Jacobs-Brichford and colleagues gave adolescent male and...

    11/07/2018 - 16:05 Neuroscience
  • News

    Like Europe, Borneo hosted Stone Age cave artists

    Discoveries on the island of Borneo illustrate that cave art emerged in Southeast Asia as early as in Western Europe, and with comparable complexity, researchers say.

    A limestone cave in eastern Borneo features a reddish-orange painting of a horned animal, possibly a type of wild cattle that may have been found on the island at the time. The painting dates to at least 40,000 years ago,...

    11/07/2018 - 13:00 Archaeology, Human Evolution