Anthropology

  1. Tech

    Readers respond to classroom robots, soil erosion and more

    Readers had comments and questions about robots in classrooms, benzodiazepines and more.

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  2. a composite photo of two skulls showing differences in overbites
    Humans

    The rise of farming altered our bite and changed how people talk

    Eating soft, processed foods refashioned adults' jaws, which added “f” and “v” sounds to speech and changed languages worldwide, a study finds.

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  3. King Richard III’s bones
    Animals

    ‘Skeleton Keys’ unlocks the history and mysteries of bones

    From fish to dinosaurs to King Richard III, ‘Skeleton Keys’ surveys the scientific and cultural history of bones.

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  4. chimpanzees
    Life

    Human encroachment threatens chimpanzee culture

    Human activity is affecting chimps’ behavioral repertoire, a new study suggests. Creating chimp cultural heritage sites might save unique behaviors.

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  5. rabbit bones
    Anthropology

    Hominids may have hunted rabbits as far back as 400,000 years ago

    Stone Age groups in Europe put small game on the menu surprisingly early.

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  6. Life

    Readers ponder mitochondria, Neandertal diets, deep sea corals and more

    Readers had questions about mitochondrial DNA, Neandertal diets, deep ocean corals and more.

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  7. Ardipithecus ramidus ankle bone
    Anthropology

    African hominid fossils show ancient steps toward a two-legged stride

    New Ardipithecus ramidus fossils reveal how hominids were shifting toward humanlike walking more than 4 million years ago.

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  8. grandma and kid
    Life

    Evolutionarily, grandmas are good for grandkids — up to a point

    Women may live past their reproductive years because they help their grandchildren survive, but there are limits to that benefit.

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  9. bone points and animal teeth
    Anthropology

    New dates narrow down when Denisovans and Neandertals crossed paths

    Mysterious ancient hominids called Denisovans and their Neandertal cousins periodically occupied the same cave starting around 200,000 years ago.

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  10. javelin throw
    Anthropology

    Why modern javelin throwers hurled Neandertal spears at hay bales

    A sporting event with replica weapons suggests that Neandertals’ spears may have been made for throwing, not just stabbing.

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  11. canine bones
    Anthropology

    Dogs may have helped ancient Middle Easterners hunt small game

    Jordanian finds point to pooch-aided hunting of small prey around 11,500 years ago, offering new clues into dog domestication in the Middle East.

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  12. digital reconstruction of two teeth
    Anthropology

    An ancient child from East Asia grew teeth like a modern human

    Choppers from a youngster with an unknown evolutionary background indicate that hominids evolved a humanlike life span in East Asia by 100,000 years ago.

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