Climate

  1. Health & Medicine

    Science budgets look rosy, AAAS finds

    The president and Congress have collaborated in targeting substantial increases for federal investments in R&D this year.

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  2. Climate

    On federal science — and science spending

    Things you might have gleaned at the AAAS Forum on Science and Technology Policy.

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  3. Earth

    A limit for carbon emissions: 1 trillion metric tons

    To reduce risks of severe damage from climate change, humans should burn no more than 1 trillion tons of carbon in total, researchers suggest.

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  4. Physics

    Obama pledges 3 percent of GDP for research

    Pledges for big budget increases for research, permanent tax credits for reseach by industry and more were announced today.

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  5. Climate

    EPA says greenhouse gases ‘endanger’ health

    Featured blog: New ruling is a likely first step toward federal moves to cut tailpipe emissions of carbon dioxide and more.

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  6. Tech

    Urban Heat: Recycling waste heat

    In the United States, only about one-eighth of the fuel people burn is converted into useful work. Recycling such wasted heat could be one of the best solutions to problems posted by growing cities.

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  7. Climate

    CO2 Rising: The World’s Greatest Environmental Challenge by Tyler Volk

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  8. Climate

    Chinese carbon dioxide emissions eclipse efficiency gains

    A boost in manufacturing and construction in China led to an increase in carbon dioxide emissions that outstripped any gains from increased energy efficiency.

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  9. Physics

    Science Stimulus

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  10. Climate

    Obama’s budget would boost science

    Featured blog: Here's a preview of what science programs the Obama administration plans to push in the coming year's federal budget.

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  11. Climate

    Hot carbon storage

    New field studies show Africa’s tropical forests have stored carbon in recent decades.

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  12. Humans

    AAAS: Climate-friendly fish

    Many intangibles determine how big — or small — the carbon footprint is of that fish you're thinking about eating.

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