Life

  1. Animals

    Don’t look now, but is that dog laughing?

    Researchers have identified a particular exhalation that dogs make while playing as a possible counterpart to a human laugh.

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  2. Paleontology

    For past climate clues, ask a stalag-mite

    Mites fossilized in cave formations in the American Southwest show that at times during the past 3,200 years the climate there was much wetter and cooler.

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  3. Animals

    Condor chicks hatch in zoo and wild

    Newly hatched California condor chicks indicate that reproduction is again taking place in the wild.

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  4. Animals

    Microbe lets mite dads perform virgin birth

    A gender-bent mite—in which altered males give birth as virgins—turns out to be the first species discovered to live and reproduce with only one set of chromosomes.

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  5. Animals

    Fruit flies hear by spinning their noses

    Drosophila have a rotating ear—and odor-sensing—structure that's new to science.

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  6. Paleontology

    Two new dinosaurs chiseled from fossil gap

    A sleek predator and a pot-bellied giant dinosaur have emerged from North American rocks to fill in a 30-million-year gap in the dinosaur fossil record.

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  7. Paleontology

    Sahara yields second-largest dinosaur

    Excavations near an Egyptian oasis have unearthed the fossils of an animal that probably ranks as the second-most-massive dinosaur known.

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  8. Paleontology

    Fossil footprints could be monumental

    Trace fossils found in a vacant lot in a small town in Utah, including the footprints of meat-eating dinosaurs, could soon be protected as part of a new U.S. national monument.

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  9. Paleontology

    Beyond Bones

    The forensic analysis of trace fossils such as footprints, nests, burrows, and even coprolites—fossilized feces—reveal subtle clues about ancient species, their behavior, and their environment.

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  10. Ecosystems

    Parrot survey finds poaching but also hope

    The largest review yet of wild parrot nesting finds poaching worrisomely frequent but also sees cause for hope in the efects of a U.S. protection law.

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  11. Paleontology

    Early Mammal’s Jaw Lost Its Groove

    A tiny fossil skull found in 195-million-year-old Chinese sediments provides evidence that crucial features of mammal anatomy evolved more than 45 million years earlier than previously thought.

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  12. Ecosystems

    Hurricanes’ full havoc yet to be felt

    When Hurricanes Dennis, Floyd, and Irene pummelled North Carolina in the fall of 1999, they delivered a three-punch sequence that may, for years to come, disrupt fishing in the Atlantic Ocean.

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