Life

  1. Animals

    Smart tags show unexpected tuna trips

    The first report on Atlantic bluefin tuna wearing electronic tags reveals much more dashing across the ocean than expected.

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  2. Paleontology

    A Ticklish Debate

    Paleontologists engaged in a contentious debate about the origins of feathers often reach interpretations that are poles apart, and they defend their views with fervor.

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  3. Animals

    Bat bites bird. . .in migration attacks

    The largest bat in Europe may hunt down migrating birds.

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  4. Ecosystems

    Marine plankton put nitrogen in a fix

    New genetic analyses of tropical marine microorganisms hint that some species are converting significant amounts of atmospheric nitrogen into nutrients, helping to fortify the base of the ocean's food pyramid.

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  5. Ecosystems

    Fish stocking may transmit toad disease

    Hatchery-raised trout can transfer a deadly fungus to western toads, bolstering the view that fish stocking may play a role in amphibian population declines.

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  6. Paleontology

    Neandertals, humans may have grown apart

    A controversial fossil analysis finds that the skulls of Neandertals and humans grew in markedly different ways.

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  7. Animals

    Roach gals get less choosy as time goes by

    As their first reproductive peak wanes, female cockroaches become more like male ones, willing to mate with any potential partner that moves.

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  8. Paleontology

    Study picks new site for dinosaur nostrils

    A new analysis of fossils and living animals suggests that most dinosaurs' nostrils occurred at locations toward the tip of their snout rather than farther up on their face, a concept that may change scientists' views of the animals' physiology and behavior.

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  9. Animals

    Don’t look now, but is that dog laughing?

    Researchers have identified a particular exhalation that dogs make while playing as a possible counterpart to a human laugh.

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  10. Paleontology

    For past climate clues, ask a stalag-mite

    Mites fossilized in cave formations in the American Southwest show that at times during the past 3,200 years the climate there was much wetter and cooler.

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  11. Animals

    Condor chicks hatch in zoo and wild

    Newly hatched California condor chicks indicate that reproduction is again taking place in the wild.

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  12. Animals

    Microbe lets mite dads perform virgin birth

    A gender-bent mite—in which altered males give birth as virgins—turns out to be the first species discovered to live and reproduce with only one set of chromosomes.

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