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@sarahzielinski
  • 10 signs you are in a catfish situation (#1: You are fried and in a sandwich) t.co/XjY97JDaEj
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Guest Writer

Sarah Zielinski

Wild Things blogger

Sarah Zielinski is an award-winning science writer and editor with more than a decade of experience covering a wide breadth of science, from astronomy to zoology. She founded and wrote Smithsonian’s Surprising Science blog and started Wild Things on her own website in early 2013 before moving it to its new home. Sarah’s work has been published in a variety of outlets, including Slate, Smithsonian, Science, Science News, National Geographic News and NPR.org.

Sarah Zielinski's Articles

  • 
    Wild Things

    Yet another reason to hate ticks

    Ticks are tiny disease-carrying parasites that should also be classified as venomous animals, a new study argues.

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    Wild Things

    Dead-ant wall protects young spider wasps

    Bone-house wasps probably use a barrier of deceased insects to guard against predators.

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    Wild Things

    Red kangaroo’s tail acts like a fifth leg

    Red kangaroos wield their tails like another limb when moving slowly.

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    Wild Things

    Why great white shark sightings are good news

    Conservation measures implemented in the 1990s halted a decline in great white sharks in the Atlantic.

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    Wild Things

    Tiny frogs host an illusion on their backs

    How dyeing dart frogs move changes how predators see the amphibians, a new study finds.

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    Wild Things

    Fish-eating spiders are the stuff of nightmares

    Spiders that feast on fish can be found on every continent but Antarctica, a new review finds.

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    Wild Things

    Mosses hitch rides on the wings of birds

    Seeds may travel from far north to south hidden in the feathers of migratory birds.

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    Wild Things

    It’s hard being a sea otter mom

    The energy requirements of lactation may explain why some female sea otters abandon their young.

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